Hong Kong Port - Facts

Topics: Port of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, International Maritime Organization Pages: 10 (2292 words) Published: April 27, 2014
HONG KONG : THE FACTS

The Port
Hong Kong is fortunate in having a sheltered natural
harbour, which provides good access and a safe
haven for vessels calling at the port from around the
world.
The port has always been a key factor in the
development and prosperity of Hong Kong, which is
strategically located on the Far East trade routes and is
in the geographical centre of the now fast-developing
Asia-Pacific Basin.
In terms of tonnage of shipping using its facilities,
cargo handled and the number of passengers carried,
Hong Kong is one of the major ports of the world.
Administration: Responsibility for administering the port
is vested in the Director of Marine. The Port Operations
Committee advises him on all matters affecting the
efficient operations of the port of Hong Kong, except
those under the purview of the Pilotage Advisory
Committee and the Local Vessels Advisory Committee.
The Hong Kong Port Development Council advises the
Government on matters related to port planning and
development and promoting Hong Kong as a regional
hub port and a leading container port in the world.
Meanwhile, the Hong Kong Maritime Industry Council
advises the Government on measures to further develop
Hong Kong’s maritime industry and to promote Hong
Kong’s position as an international maritime centre. Both
councils are chaired by the Secretary for Transport and
Housing.
The Marine Department ensures that conditions
exist to enable ships to enter the port, work their cargoes
and leave as quickly and as safely as possible. It is
concerned with many aspects of safety and pollution
prevention standards for all classes and types of vessels,
from the largest container vessels to the smallest
passenger-carrying sampans. It also maintains aids to
navigation and mooring buoys for sea-going ships,
manages three cross-boundary ferry terminals and
administers six public cargo working areas. The
Department’s
website
(http://www.mardep.gov.hk/)
provides a wide range of information on the port and the
Hong Kong Shipping Register.
Shipping: Hong Kong continues to flourish as a hub port
serving the South Asian Pacific region and acting as an
entrepot for the Mainland of China. During 2012, some
383 350 sea-going vessels and river-trade vessels
arrived in and departed from Hong Kong.
Hong Kong has a reputation for efficient cargo
handling operations. The average turnaround time for
container vessels at the container terminals is about 10
hours. For conventional vessels working in mid-stream at
buoys or anchorages, it is 33 and 32 hours respectively.
Containerisation: The Kwai Chung and Tsing Yi
Container Terminals, located in the north-western part of

the harbour, has nine container terminals with 24 berths
of about 7 694 metres of deep water frontage. It covers a
total terminal area of about 279 hectares which includes
container yards and container freight stations. The nine
container terminals have a total handling capacity of
about 20 million TEUs (20-foot equivalent units) which
helps maintain Hong Kong as a major port of Southern
China.
Hong Kong handled 23.1 million TEUs in 2012,
making it one of the world’s busiest container ports. Of
the total container throughput, some 17.5 million TEUs
were handled at Kwai Chung and Tsing Yi Container
Terminals, while about 5.6 million TEUs were handled in
mid-stream and other wharves.
Cross Boundary Ferry Services: In 2012, the Hong
Kong-Macau Ferry Terminal in Sheung Wan, the China
Ferry Terminal in Tsim Sha Tsui and Tuen Mun Ferry
Terminal in Tuen Mun provided centralised ferry services
to Macao and 11 ports in the Mainland. About 100
vessels, mostly high-speed passenger craft such as
jetfoils and catamarans, operated from these terminals.
In 2012, 25.68 million passengers passed through the
terminals, comprising 20.94 million passenger trips
to/from Macau and about 4.74 million passenger trips
to/from Mainland ports....
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