Feminist View on the Great Gatsby Essay Example

Good Essays
Susan B. Anthony once said “The true republic: Men, their rights and nothing more;

Women, their rights and nothing less.” This is her point of view on the way women were

thought of during the 1920s. She recognizes the large gap between women and men’s rights.

During this time though, many changes had began. Women just got the right to vote, therefore

gaining more independence of their own which they did not always know how to use. This is

also when the trend of a flapper began. Views changed from politics to social lives, hem lines

were raised, and risks were taken. The confusion of this time for most men is easily seen in The

Great Gatsby. In The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald, women are portrayed as a minor role

to society. They are reliant and selfish by expecting men to take care of them, they are shown

as nothing more than a status symbol in the way that they allow men to control them, and they

are unfaithful and dishonest.

The main women in The Great Gatsby, Daisy and Myrtle, depend on the man that they

are with to support them and buy them anything they wish. Myrtle, for instance, is unhappy

with her life with Wilson. She sought out another man to take care of her, someone that can

spoil her. Wilson offering her everything he could is not enough for Myrtle. She complains

about it even when he tries his best, by saying things like, “He borrowed somebody’s best suit

to get married in” (F. Scott Fitzgerald 35). Wilson cannot afford a suit so he borrows one from

someone else, and although he tried his best for her it is not enough. In her mind she needs to

be taken care of, and the state of poverty that Wilson was in just does not do. Myrtle feels she

deserves and needs a man that could buy her anything her heart desires. Tom was the perfect

candidate for her; he was very wealthy and welcoming to the idea of an affair. She loves Tom

for the simple fact that he can support her, although she knows

You May Also Find These Documents Helpful

  • Better Essays

    Point of view is a critical narrative technique that F. Scott Fitzgerald frequently manipulates throughout The Great Gatsby (1925) to manipulate and shape the reader’s response to the various issues explored. Point of view (in fictional writing) is the narrator’s position in relation to the story being told. Through the first person and sometimes third person limited retrospective narrative voice of Nick Carraway, Fitzgerald invites us to condemn or condone various aspects of “the roaring twenties”…

    • 2452 Words
    • 10 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Good Essays

    According to a study conducted by the Center for the Study of Women in Television and Film, females comprise of only 29 percent of progratonists in the top 100 films. This evidence shows that even in 2017, females are discriminated against in all types of media. In “The Offshore Pirate”, F. Scott Fitzgerald takes a different approach. Written during the height of the women’s suffrage movement, Fitzgerald places a strong female character as the protagonist of his story. Ardita Farnam, a young 19 year…

    • 741 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Feminist Criticism of The Great Gatsby Feminist criticism focuses on the power relationships between genders and the ways pieces of literature has been shaped according to them. During the 1920’s, many changes had begun to counter the evident inequality between men and women. Views readily changed from politics to social lives as woman’s hemlines were raised and risks were taken. The confusion of this time for most men is seen in The Great Gatsby. In The Great Gatsby, Fitzgerald portrays the new…

    • 582 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Satisfactory Essays

    In The Great Gatsby most of chapter 1's focus is on introducing the characters and revealing a little about their lives. Daisy tells very little about the daughter of her and Tom, such a small amount in fact her name is not even given. When Daisy explains to Nick about when she had her, a feminist would clearly be able to point out what she is saying goes against feminism. Through the lens of a feminist, Daisy is objectifying her daughter when she says " All right, I said, I'm glad it's a girl.…

    • 262 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Satisfactory Essays
  • Better Essays

    Great Gatsby Essay Example

    • 2271 Words
    • 10 Pages

    In chapter 6 of The Great Gatsby, a reporter comes to Gatsby’s door to interview him about his personal life. Jay Gatsby’s original name was James Gatz and he was born on a North Dakota farm but went to college in St. Olaf, Minnesota. He dropped out of college and later met the wealthy Dan Cody who hired him as a personal assistant. When Dan Cody died he left Gatsby $25,000, but his mistress prevented Gatsby from claiming it. After that, Gatsby was determined to become rich and successful. Later…

    • 2271 Words
    • 10 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Good Essays

    The Great Gatsby The Great Gatsby was a novel written by an American author named F. Scott Fitzgerald in the 1930s. The Great Gatsby is a novel that deals with the old rich colliding with the new rich, told through a man named Nick's point of view. In The Great Gatsby, Nick makes friends with Jay Gatsby, who attained his fortune by bootlegging. Bootleggers were people who sold alcohol illegally during the brief ban on alcohol in the United States during the 1930s and led to higher organized crime…

    • 660 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Better Essays

    Great Gatsby Essay Example

    • 2362 Words
    • 10 Pages

    "'Her voice is full of money,' [Gatsby] said suddenly. That was it. I'd never understood before. It was full of money- that was the inexhaustible charm that rose and fell in it, the jingle of it, the cymbals' song of it...High in a white palace the king's daughter, the golden girl" (127). This jarring reference to the intoxicating allure Daisy Buchanan holds over Jay Gatsby is the essence of F. Scott Fitzgerald's The Great Gatsby. Gatsby, throughout the novel, is utterly infatuated with Daisy in…

    • 2362 Words
    • 10 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Better Essays

    intriguing exchange between Nick and Gatsby takes place near the end of Chapter Six: “I wouldn’t ask too much of her,” Nick says “You can’t repeat the past.” “Can’t repeat the past?” Gatsby cries out. “Why of course you can!” (p. 110). How does the past impinge upon the present in the lives of both Nick and Gatsby? Should we see Gatsby as eccentric in his view that one cannot merely repeat, but change, the past by starting over? Past and Hope in The Great Gatsby Mason Scisco “So we beat on, boats…

    • 1192 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Good Essays

    happiness, like Gatsby. In F. Scott Fitzgerald, The Great Gatsby, displays that money does not necessarily bring happiness. Money does not necessarily bring happiness because Daisy has a lot of money and she is not happy at all. "Your revolting," (139) said Daisy to Tom. Daisy has money and material things, but with just those things one cannot achieve happiness. Daisy is not happy with Tom because of his affairs. "Rich girls don't marry poor boys," Daisy exclaimed to Gatsby. Daisy thinks…

    • 640 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    a philosophical view on 'The Great Gatsby'--using time as a key dimension to ones life theme. The Great Gatsby - Essay Topic: Time as a key dimension to one's life's theme. Time is an idea described in different periods and aspects, for example philosophical, psychological, physical and biological. This time flows evenly but is broken into the past, present and future. Since we only live in the present forever planning for our futures and dreams, when we try to live in the past it restricts…

    • 616 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Good Essays