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A Response to a People's History of the United States Essay Example

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A Response to a People's History of the United States Essay Example
Chapter One:

I am a bit angered by the driving statement in this chapter, which is that the atrocities of the past are quietly accepted for the sake of progress. Howard Zinn uses the instances of Columbus’ first arrival to the West Indies and the eventual mass genocide that took place as an example of this very statement. Another example of such an injustice is the invasion of the British into North America and the Spaniards into South America. Other information released in this chapter is the fact that the Indians tried to appeal to their invaders more humane side so that both opposing powers could live in harmony. Why is it that the hunger for space and land was so strong that the British could not find it within themselves to merely be happy in sharing? The Indians provided them with food in the harsh winter months as well as a means of protecting the British from exposure in the cold. It was pretty heartless to decimate an entire peoples after they were so hospitable. Howard Zinn also goes on to speak of the Indians’ customs and culture which also gives further insight as to why the Indians gave without expecting in return.

Chapter Two:

This chapter begins to speak in depth about black slavery within America. The first Jamestown colonists were struggling with their new environment due to the fact that they were ignorant of the ability to grow food and could not depend upon the Indians’ help forced or otherwise due to the fact that they were outnumbered and were already on bad terms with them. So the ultimate effect was black slaves, the practice was already being used in South America and it was considered in a way ingenious. I was a bit irritated that merely because the Africans were torn from their land and their culture they were considered inferior to the Europeans. Even though the Europeans could secure and invade the African coastline they were unable to subdue deeper within the continent, not only does that bring some sort of pride to me, it

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