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A Comparison of 1984 and Brave New World Essay Example

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A Comparison of 1984 and Brave New World Essay Example
1984 vs. Brave New World Both Aldous Huxley and George Orwell wrote how they envisioned America in the future. While each account gave comparably alarming views, Huxley’s thoughts on how the United States would turn out are much more relevant today. Nell Postman, a contemporary social critic, states this in his passage contrasting Orwell’s 1984 and Huxley’s Brave New World. Although Americans had not been affected by the horrors Orwell foresaw, they had experienced different, perhaps more destructive evils which Huxley predicted. Context plays an integral role in the writings of 1984 and Brave New World. Brave New World was written in 1936, only six years after the Roaring Twenties and right in the middle of the Great Depression. During the 1920s, America was in a state of chaos. People ran amuck and had little consequences for their actions. Women had gained more freedom, and promiscuity was on the rise. The depression following this decade of wealth and indiscrimination proved that with great happiness came great demise. People’s ability to attain ultimate pleasure led them to live at their lowest. Huxley used this in his novel. People’s pleasure would eventually control them, just as he had witnessed. On the other hand, Orwell wrote 1984 on the heels of World War II. The nation was up against thunderous dictators from countries such as Japan and Germany. Orwell saw firsthand how a single figure could control a country using society fear. Even though the context of the two novels is different, the basic concept in both is very similar: the future of America will be controlled and full of oppression. While Orwell believes that oppression will come from an outside source, Big Brother in the story, Huxley believes a more abstract, yet in reality, a much simpler idea. Huxley thinks that the oppression will come from within. He feared that there would be no need for an outside source; people would not only accept, but welcome and come to love their affliction.

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