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A Tale of Two Cities Ch 5 and 6

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A Tale of Two Cities Ch 5 and 6
English 4 – A Tale of Two Cities – Chapters 5 and 6 Study Questions

PLEASE ANSWER THE FOLLOWING QUESTIONS IN COMPLETE, DETAILED SENTENCES ON YOUR OWN SHEET OF PAPER. ADD A QUOTE TO SUPPORT EACH ANSWER.

Chapter 5 atomies – tiny particles billets – chunky pieces of wood farthing – small value of money feigned – pretended garret – attic gloweringly – in a manner characterized by sullen, angry expressions implacable – unchanging kennel – gutter in a street modicum – small amount offal – waste porringer – shallow cup or bowl triumvirate – group of three
1. What do you think the spilled wine symbolizes in this story?
2. Find an example of how Charles Dickens uses personification to draw the emotions and sympathies of the reader to the suffering of the peasants.
3. Briefly describe the wine shop owner. What does the following passage from this chapter say about the character of the wine shop owner?
“…a man of a strong resolution, and a set purpose; a man not desirable to be met rushing down a narrow pass with a gulf on either side, for nothing would turn the man.”
4. Briefly describe Madame Defarge. What is she doing with her hands? What does the following passage from this chapter say about her character?
“…one might have predicated that she did not often make mistakes against herself in any of the reckonings over which she presided.”
5. What information about Lucie’s father’s state of mind is revealed to Mr. Lorry during the climb up the five flights of stairs to Dr. Manette’s room?
6. Who are the other Jacques, and why does Monsieur Defarge show them Dr. Manette in his pitiful condition? What is implied about the secret lives of Monsieur and Madame Defarge?

Chapter 6: The Shoemaker
Vocabulary
postilion – person who rides a coach and guides the rear horse of a pair provender – food
1. What is peculiar about the way Dr. Manette listens to the visitors? What is One Hundred and Five, North Tower?
2. How does Dr. Manette behave toward Lucie? For whom does he mistake her? What is in the folded rag around his neck?
3. Read the following quotation. What do you think Lucie’s hair symbolizes in the story?
“His cold white head mingled with her radiant hair, which warmed and lighted it as though it were the light of Freedom shining on him.”
4. Why is Dr. Manette confused when he finally goes down the stairs with his daughter?
5. Why do you think Dr. Manette wants his shoemaking tools before he will leave the wine shop?
6. What is the hook Dickens uses at the end of this chapter to entice the reader back next week for the new chapter?

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