A Room of One's Own

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The View Towards Feminism and A Room of One’s Own Written in 1929, A Room of One’s Own by Virginia Woolf has been broken apart into many different view points and meanings that in a whole, affect woman and/or artists. The interesting thing about Woolf’s piece, is that it’s an essay that uses fictional characters and narration that would later be used to debate whether it was completely a true feminist approach to women’s writing and money, or if wasn’t enough of a feminist approach, especially when involving other races. Some of the critics argue that Woolf way of writing scrambled the ideas that were supposed to be taken from the essay. Others believe that the style in which the essay was wrote had no affect on its meanings involving women and society. Such beliefs lead to never-ending discussions on one of the most important works by a leading writer of the Modernists movement. The early 20th century novelists, Andrew Bennett, is one who believed that Woolf’s essay wasn’t at all a feminist work. In labeling it as non-political, Bennett states: “It is an essay a little about men and a great deal about women. But it is not ‘feminist.’ It is non-partisan”(Bennett). It seems more clear that Bennett in away rejects the political idea of Feminism because at the time of it’s writing, to be a feminists, was to be all for women suffrage. Around the time when women were granted suffrage, Woolf had gained an inheritance and soon wrote “of the two-the vote and the money-the money, I own, seemed infinitely more important”(Woolf). Bennett uses this quote that she wrote as evidence for his case that Woolf did not value the right to vote as much as she valued money, thus, not portraying a feminist edge. In the time in which Bennett and Woolf lived, feminism and suffrage went hand in hand, conveying the same meaning. With Woolf not considering suffrage as much of an importance, in a way portrays her as a non and anti-feminist. Unlike Bennett,

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