A Reflection of Ovid's, Metamorphosis

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A Reflection of Metamorphosis Ovid’s Metamorphosis was unlike anything I have ever read fifteen books skillfully and creatively compiled into one. The epic proved to be thought provoking, yet comical at the same time, making it an easy read. I recently realized that over the past few weeks Metamorphosis has somewhat become a part of me, that’s what makes it such a great epic. I often find myself alluding to its characters, story plots, and themes. Metamorphosis certainly covered a lot of territory, jealousy, desire, love, revenge, and of course changes. It is without a doubt a tale for the ages, with themes that are will be forever. Throughout the epic staggering desire determines actions and emotions, leaving behind devastation and sadness wherever it strikes. With the type of love displayed in Metamorphosis nobody won, it was constant tales of unfulfilled love. The characters pursued love, lust and desire at all cost, even if it meant incest. The stories of the Daughters of Minyas stood out the most to me in regards to love. As the sisters literally weave they figuratively wove stories of unfulfilled love. Being that I am a hopeless romantic, I was filled with satisfaction by the three stories. Although each of the daughters stories involved different kinds of people, they all centered around thwarted longing and desire.
Revenge is a reoccurring theme in Metamorphosis. The revenge was typically the cause of whatever transformation the mini story was explaining. The gods punished almost every major character for their wrongdoing, regardless of the severity of the crime. The first instance of revenge transformation was when Diana punishes Actaeon for casually stumbling upon her while she was bathing. Throughout the epic it seemed as though each act of revenge was contained an ironic twist at the fate of the victim. For Actaeon’s accidental mistake he was punished by being transformed from the hunter to the hunted. His transformation was concluded when his

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