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A Marxist Reading of Frankenstein

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A Marxist Reading of Frankenstein
A Marxist Reading of Frankenstein A Marxist reading of the novel shows that this work is an active agent exposing and criticizing society's oppressive economic and ideological systems. The fear played upon in this work is in actuality a fear of revolution. Many generations experience the horror and terror of this thought evoking novel in an entirely different light. What was once a so called transgression in the 19th century is widely accepted amongst the people of the 21st century. Embedded in the text are several allegories which interrogate and ridicule the key beliefs and motivations of society. This essay will explore the ways in which Shelley presents the mind-set of human society and civilisation in one of the earliest science fiction novels.
The main plot of the novel reflects in historical context of oppression as there were great social upheavals at the time it was written. The English, French and Haitian revolution all played upon Shelley’s conscience with her abolitionist parents having a large influence upon these views. Shelley’s work plays on society’s fear of creating monsters that go out of control and create revolutions, this can been seen with the characterisation of the creature who is a symbol for the oppressed people. The creature is composed of different body parts, this is similar to the proletariat in that it “is recruited from all classes of the population”; a repulsive idea to humanity, however victor does not consider the wellbeing of the creature but merely considers his own gain of respect and power in the scientific community. Similarly the citizens of 19th century Britain and France are controlled by authoritative figures whose higher intentions are for self-gain. In terms of Marxism, the creature represents the proletariats who are physically bigger and stronger ; “As the minuteness of the parts formed a great hindrance to my speed, I resolved, contrary to my first intention, to make the being of a gigantic stature; that is

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