A General Comparison between the Senate of Ancient Rome and the Senate of the United States

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A General Comparison between the Senate of Ancient Rome and the Senate of the United States Research Class
16th August 2012

Outline
I. Introduction
Thesis statement: It is known to most that Western countries are on the rule of parliamentary democracy. We also know that Western countries inherited their political system from the ancient Greeks and Romans, especially the Roman political system. It has shaped western parliamentary system more than any others. However, different parliamentary systems have their specific characteristics. Has shaped from what it was in Ancient Rome to that we see today. This paper will compare and contrast the Ancient Roman Senate to today Modern American Senate.

II. The brief explanation of the Roman Senate
A. The Roman Senate
B. The brief history of the Senate
C. The lesson from the result of the Senate

III. The brief introduction of the Senate of the United States of the American
A. The Montesquieu’s political science and the United States
B. The brief history of the Senate
C. The present situation of the Senate

IV. The political similarity of the Senates
A. The function of the Senates
B. The filibusters and quorums
C. The political darkness of the Senates

V. The general difference between the Roman and United States Senates A. The membership of the Senates B. The political parties

VI. Conclusion

A General Comparison between the Senate of Ancient Rome and the Senate of the United States It is known to most that western countries are on the rule of parliamentary democracy. We also know that Western countries inherited their political system from the ancient Greeks and Romans, especially the Roman political system. It has shaped the western parliamentary system more than any others. However, different parliamentary systems and their specific characteristics have shaped Ancient Rome from what it was to



Cited: "..: Etrusia - Roman History :.." Etrusia. Web. 14 Aug. 2012. . Astin, A "Connexions Social Justice Encyclopedia." Persons Listed in Connexipedia: Connexipedia Connexions Encyclopedia of Social Justice. Web. 07 Aug. 2012. . "Constitution of the Roman Republic - Citizendia." Constitution of the Roman Republic - Citizendia "The Ethics of Human Rights (6): Human Rights and Maslowâs Hierarchy Of Needs." P.a.p.-Blog, Human Rights Etc.Web. 09 Aug. 2012. . "Filibuster." Dictionary.com Pearson, Monte. Perils of Empire the Roman Republic and the American Republic. New York: Algora Pub., 2008. Print. "Quorums." Dictionary.com "Visit the Roman and United States Senates." Visit the Roman and United States Senates. N.p., n.d. Web. 09 Aug. 2012. . Williams, David Lay

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