A Comparison Between the Poems ‘No More Hiroshimas’ and ‘Dulce Et Decorum Est’

Topics: World War II, Poetry, Nuclear weapon Pages: 4 (1473 words) Published: December 22, 2010
The two poems have a similar message: war doesn’t change over time, lives will always be lost, and whether you are experiencing or remembering the war, the horror, sadness and suffering will be present. The poem ‘No More Hiroshimas’ focuses on the reminders and memorials of the atomic bomb while ‘Dulce et Decorum Est’ describes what war is like for an ordinary soldier. These poems have a lot in common, but at the same time they have their differences. The use of diction by both poets allows readers to understand that war is a terrible experience for people, and just as painful for people who are remembering it. In ‘No More Hiroshimas’, James Kirkup writes about how the memorials of the atomic bomb are filled with fake cheerfulness, and that they actually should be filled with sorrow and pain. It is clear that Kirkup believes that people are trying to forget and continue their lives in a happy manner. He writes “A kind of life goes on, in cinemas and hi-fi coffee bars.” This implies that the life people live isn’t real, that it is a “kind of life” and fake. He also goes on and writes that not only are the people pretending to be happy, but the memorials are just as false. The poet describes the “models of the bombed Industry Promotion Hall, memorial ruin tricked out with glitter-frost and artificial pearls.” This suggests that the memorials are “tricked”, with its decorations being positive, and the use of “artificial” further emphasizes that they are just pretending to be joyful. On the other hand, ‘Dulce et Decorum Est’ straightforwardly describes the negative aspects of war. Wilfred Owen writes about how terrible war is for ordinary soldiers to experience. He portrays the soldiers as “All went lame, all blind; drunk with fatigue; deaf even to the hoots of gas-shells dropping softly behind.” This here shows that they are so exhausted that they are “blind”, and unable to see anything properly, this is accentuated by the word “drunk” which indicates that there...
Continue Reading

Please join StudyMode to read the full document

You May Also Find These Documents Helpful

  • Dulce Et Decorum Est Comparison Essay
  • Dulce et Decorum Est Essay
  • Dulce Et Decorum Est Essay
  • Dulce et Decorum Est Essay
  • Dulce Et Decorum Est Essay
  • Dulce Et Decorum Est Essay
  • Dulce Et Decorum Est Essay
  • Dulce et Decorum Est Essay

Become a StudyMode Member

Sign Up - It's Free