A Buddhists Worldview

Good Essays
PART I
A Buddhists worldview The Question of Origin - “How did life begin?” (Dr. Weider, 2011) Buddhists are atheists meaning they do not believe in God (Caner, 2008). Buddhists believe in a philosophy and their belief is not considered a religion. (Caner, 2008) Buddhism was founded by Siddartha Gautama. Siddartha Gautama was a prince and was born in northeastern India around 560 B.C. (Caner, 2008) Gautama fasted underneath a fig tree and meditated for seven days. After mediating and after no eating or drinking, Gautama reached a state of Nirvana. The fig tree was renamed as the Bodhi tree (tree of wisdom) and Siddartha Gautama renamed himself as Buddha (Enlightened One). The “Buddha” shared his teachings of the “four noble truths” (Caner, 2008). These teachings from Buddha lack the understanding of how life began.
The Question of Identity – “What does it mean to be a human?” (Dr. Weider, 2011) Buddhists follow the teachings from Buddha. The teachings are the “Four Noble Truths and the Eightfold Noble Path” (Caner, 2008). By following the “Eightfold Noble Path” a Buddhist believes they can reach perfection. Buddhists believe in balancing their energy and finding there “middle way.” (Caner, 2008)
The Question of Meaning/Purpose – “Why does mankind exist?” (Dr. Weider, 2011) Buddhists believe their purpose/meaning is defined by the “Four Noble Truths”. The first noble truth is “Suffering is life”. The second noble truth is “the cause of suffering is desired.” The third noble truth is “to stop suffering a Buddhist must stop desire”. The fourth noble truth is, “to stop desire, which would stop suffering, is the Eightfold Noble Path.” (Caner, 2008)
The Question of Morality – “What is meant by right and wrong?” (Dr. Weider, 2011) The Buddha’s “Eightfold Noble Path” is eight steps to releasing oneself from suffering. The eight steps are, “right speech, right action, right livelihood, right effort, right awareness, right meditation, right understanding,



Bibliography: Caner, E. a. (2008). The popular Encyclopedia of Apologetics . Eugene: Harvest House Publishers. Dr. Weider, L. a. (2011). Consider. Virginia Beach: Academx Publishing Services.

You May Also Find These Documents Helpful

  • Good Essays

    Buddhist

    • 2256 Words
    • 10 Pages

    Entrance Figure [ 1 ]: Picture Taken by Zain Malik - Entrance For my field research report my partners and I visited the largest Chinese Buddhist temple in Mississauga called Fo Guanh Shan Temple of Toronto on February 11th during their festival of the Chinese New Year. Originally this is my first time visiting a Buddhist temple in Canada, but the very first Buddhist temple I visited was at the age of six with my family on a trip to Thailand. During my visit in Toronto, I was really overwhelmed with…

    • 2256 Words
    • 10 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Satisfactory Essays

    Buddhist Meditation

    • 915 Words
    • 4 Pages

    truly be explained once experienced. It is the practice of mental concentration leading ultimately through a sequence of stages to the final goal of spiritual freedom, nirvana. The purpose of Buddhist meditation is to free ourselves from the delusion and thereby put an end to both ignorance and craving. The Buddhists describe the culminating trance-like state as transient; final Nirvana requires the insight of wisdom. The exercises that are meant to develop wisdom involve meditation on the true nature…

    • 915 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Satisfactory Essays
  • Good Essays

    Buddhist Mudras

    • 732 Words
    • 3 Pages

    Buddhist Mudras Lydia Pierce Art Menu 2 6/9/2013 Buddhism is a religion mostly practiced throughout Eastern Asia and India. Buddhist art comes in many forms, but sculptures are very commonly seen. These sculptures are usually of Great Buddhas or Great Deities and are riddled with symbolism. I researched the symbolism of the hand gestures, also known as Mudras. Mudras can convey feelings, intentions, and wisdom to the viewer. Buddhists believe that with mudras, postures…

    • 732 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Buddhist Utopia

    • 866 Words
    • 4 Pages

    Comparing and Contrasting More’s Utopia with a Buddhist Utopia Nothing could be further apart than the society depicted by Thomas More and an ideal Buddhist society. That may be what is first conveyed to people when they consider these two vastly different societies in a comparative manner. The first indicator of these extreme differences is that the Buddhist utopia is very much a mental one, while More’s utopia is more so a place where things are just in their perfected state. That being…

    • 866 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Satisfactory Essays

    Buddhist Ethics

    • 366 Words
    • 1 Page

    Buddhist Ethics 4 Noble Truths: To live is to suffer, Suffering comes from desire, To end suffering we must end desire, Release from suffering is possible through the noble eightfold path. The four noble truth is a like a doctor, you have the symptoms, diagnosis, prognosis and the prescription The weakness of Buddhist Ethics, many Buddhist are opposed to any form Of violence, the Dalia Lama prohibits the use of arms even in cases of self defense, another weakness of Buddhist is there is no independent…

    • 366 Words
    • 1 Page
    Satisfactory Essays
  • Good Essays

    Buddhist Beliefs

    • 925 Words
    • 4 Pages

    (2) The Buddhists hold that every creature fears death, and suffers in it (or in the thought of it), and that therefore it is wrong to kill any living thing. On the other side it can be argued that every living thing dies anyway, and that suffering is unavoidable except for trained Buddhists. Does this undermine the case for the Buddhist doctrine of non-injury to living things, or is there still a case? The Buddhist doctrine of non-injury to living things is, of course, a natural consequence…

    • 925 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Powerful Essays

    Buddhist Iconography

    • 30964 Words
    • 124 Pages

    . He was elected Vice President of World Fellowship of Buddhist Youth WFBY for the years –. His major research work on ife and ontribution of epalese rincess hrikuti evi is shortly forthcoming. Mr. Shakya was nominated by Venerable Master Hsing Yun, Fokuang Shan, Taiwan as Research Associate in Fokuang Shan Chinese Buddhist Research Academy for the years –. In , he was granted a SAARC Fellowship (Buddhist Studies) by the Ministry of Foreign Affairs, impu, Bhutan. Currently…

    • 30964 Words
    • 124 Pages
    Powerful Essays
  • Good Essays

    Buddhist Economics

    • 1484 Words
    • 6 Pages

    Buddhists Economics Ideas of Buddhist economists are foreign to those of western civilization. In a nation where business profit is the number one priority, ethics in Western economics are rarely given the same importance. In Buddha’s Eightfold Path is the principle to Right Livelihood. This means that one must live in such a way that does not bring harm or violence to another being, in all aspects of life, including how one obtains their wealth. This brings about the matters Buddhist feel…

    • 1484 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    buddhist temples

    • 746 Words
    • 3 Pages

    Buddhist temples are perfect samples of Asian architecture. In this respect, Chinese Buddhist temples are particularly noteworthy since they mirror the architecture of China and include religious elements. In this respect, the White Horse Temple in China is particularly noteworthy. I visited the temple and was impressed by its architecture and atmosphere which was really inspiring, even though I am not a Buddhist. In fact, the Buddhist temple is fashioned after imperial palaces and bears very little…

    • 746 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Satisfactory Essays

    Buddhist Culture

    • 146 Words
    • 1 Page

    person with a Buddhist faith, I am able to relate and experience the values of a Buddhist, but also compare my values to the American society, since I was born and raised in Denver, Colorado. Everyday, Buddhist people are friendly, well-balance human beings that believe in peace amongst the world and believe that nothing in the world should suffer. On the other hand, Americans have other religions, such as Catholics and Christians, which worship their god primarily on Sundays. The Buddhist culture is…

    • 146 Words
    • 1 Page
    Satisfactory Essays