A Beautiful Mind

Better Essays
Nicole Calabro
Professor Kulpanowski
PSY 2013
October 21, 2013
A Beautiful Mind

“A Beautiful Mind” is a sad yet unique, inspiring film. The film was directed by Ron Howard and provided people a whole new perspective on psychological disorders. When people generally hear the words “mental illness,” the thoughts of crazy, insane, different, abnormal and weird come into place. “A Beautiful Mind,” based on a true story and a novel by Sylvia Nasar, has proven the standard thoughts to be inaccurate. John Nash was a man of extraordinary character. He held a position of great intelligence and had proven it to be true when he was awarded with the Nobel Memorial Prize in economics. Nash was also faced with great difficulty when he was diagnosed with schizophrenia (Lipovetsky, 2009). After watching the movie for the first time, it is clear to see John Nash is not the average person, but it was quite a shock to find out he had a psychological disorder as severe as schizophrenia. After watching the movie again, knowing what he had been diagnosed with, the picture became all too clear. It was very obvious that he suffered from schizophrenia because of the symptoms he had shown. There are predominantly three phases associated with schizophrenia. The beginning stage, or the prodromal stage, is where the symptoms start to develop and this phase can last for up to months. This is when the patient becomes less interested in his or her surroundings and finds his or herself with trouble concentrating, tending to be more distracted than usual. The second phase is called the active phase. This is where delusions and hallucinations come about. The final stage is called the residual phase. During this phase the symptoms from the prodromal stage can possibly increase and there is a chance that they will become worse. This stage is almost the same as the prodromal stage, but to a more extreme (What is schizophrenia; schizophrenia 2009). Nash’s major symptoms of



Cited: Bustillo, Juan. (2008). Schizophrenia . Whitehouse Station, NJ: Merck Sharp and Dohm Corp. Dryden-Edwards, Roxanne. (2010). Schizophrenia. MedicineNet.com. Jaffe, DJ. (2001). Schizophrenia treatment . Lipovetsky, Josh. (2009). A beautiful mind- life isn 't an equation. Mayo Clinic Staff, . (2008). Paranoid schizophrenia. MFMER. Papalos, Demitri. (2001). Electroconvulsive therapy overview . Smith, Nicole. (2010). The film “a beautiful mind” and the representation of schizophrenia and mental illness. Article Myriad. What is schizophrenia; schizophrenia: an information guide . (2009). CAMH.

You May Also Find These Documents Helpful

  • Satisfactory Essays

    a beautiful mind

    • 477 Words
    • 2 Pages

    How did his wife play an important role in dealing with his Schizophrenia? She made decisions about his treatment for Schizophrenia. The side effect from the pills he was taking caused his sexual performance to go down, Even though his wife got very frustrated she still stay by his side.…

    • 477 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Satisfactory Essays
  • Satisfactory Essays

    A Beautiful Mind

    • 348 Words
    • 2 Pages

    4.) What are five (5) possible causes of schizophrenia? Based on what you see from the film, which do you think was most likely the cause of John Nash developing the disorder?…

    • 348 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Satisfactory Essays
  • Powerful Essays

    The film “A Beautiful Mind” (Grazer, 2001) tells of the true life of John Nash, a Nobel Prize winner who has struggled the majority of his life with paranoid schizophrenia. This essay will evaluate John Nash’s exhibited behaviors, and how therapists from the 5 perspectives of abnormal psychology would have treated his illness.…

    • 1443 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Powerful Essays
  • Good Essays

    A Beautiful Mind Analysis

    • 1124 Words
    • 5 Pages

    In A Beautiful Mind, director Ron Howard uses symbolism to show the danger of using isolation as a method of coping with problems. This film sheds some light on the horrors of a mental illness and advocates the importance of accepting others’ help. When John Nash is suffering from schizophrenia, the contrast between darkness and bright lighting is a metaphor for the darkness he surrounds himself with despite his wife’s attempts to help. The venetian blinds obscuring his face when he stands at his window symbolize the confinement of isolation.…

    • 1124 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Mental illnesses prohibit many individuals from accomplishing their goals. They are seen as unstable or incapable. Illnesses like depression and schizophrenia impair judgment and reduce self worth. Shakespeare's "Hamlet" shows the lead character, Hamlet, suffer after the loss of his father, becoming excessively moody and suicidal. Sylvia Nasar's book A Beautiful Mind, gives a look into the great mathematician, John Nash's spiral into schizophrenia almost ruining his work. Both characters must overcome their illness to achieve their grand goals.…

    • 541 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Positive symptoms are hallucination, speech disorganized, delusion, inappropriate laughter, and tears. For example a positive symptom can be described when the person is told a sad tale; he will show reactions such smile or laughter while related to the story. Patient with negative symptoms are usually quiet, expressions faces, toneless voices and rigid body posture. Positive behaviors are more seeing that governed the person. The negative are the absences of appropriate behaviors (First M.B., Tasman, A.2006, pp.245, 249). John Nash experienced remissions or at least diminishment in which are called to be the positive or active symptoms of schizophrenia. An example of these positive symptoms are presented in the film, one of those scene is when he goes outside to throw the trash and he is able to social with the garbage man, his wife Alicia gets a little bit worried but when she realized that he is telling the truth, she feels relieve that he is coming to a remission process. Furthermore social withdrawal, flat affects and lack of motivations are the negative symptoms. In the scene when John feels he can’t function, with his work, with the care of his son and couldn’t response to his…

    • 392 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    One scene that will remain in my mind forever and the best example of the negative symptoms of Schizophrenia is a scene where John Nash is shown holding his infant son while the baby is crying and Nash shows absolutely no sign of emotion at all. This is just one example, although a loss of feeling is one of the most predominate negative symptoms. Nash's flat affect is seen through out the film in many instances but that scene that shows him holding the baby shows…

    • 924 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Powerful Essays

    Forrest Gump

    • 3984 Words
    • 16 Pages

    Of all the disturbances being listed in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-IV-TR)1 only a few of them have not yet been portrayed in films. Cinema has certainly been fascinated by insanity and its manifestations, and psychiatric disorders have provided film directors and scriptwriters with a stream of material for their scripts, action, and themes. Taking that interest into account, it is necessary to reflect on the vision of mental disturbances that has been transmitted by cinema to the public in general. For most average citizens the only contact they may have with the psychiatric reality is through cinema; hence, films are their one - yet strong -…

    • 3984 Words
    • 16 Pages
    Powerful Essays
  • Powerful Essays

    By adulthood, each of us has stood in judgment of a film at some point in our lives. We sometimes judge the quality of the acting, the cinematography, or the writing, taking note of the entertainment value of each. Within some movies, however, is what some would argue is a far more important aspect that deserves attention, that of the film’s content. When that content involves a psychological disorder, this attention often turns to scrutiny, leading to arguments about whether the portrayal of the disorder is accurate, and whether the public mind will be altered by its exposure to that portrayal.…

    • 1317 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Powerful Essays
  • Good Essays

    A Beautiful Mind, written by Ron Howard, it tells the story of a brilliant mathematician named John Nash who eventually discovers he had an ill mind when he is seeing people who aren’t real. As John goes through college at Princeton and the rest of his complex career we watch him battle his own mind. The director uses several different film techniques to walk the viewers through the life of having a crazy but beautiful mind.…

    • 775 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Though this revelation may seem without importance, accurate and diverse representation of mental illnesses in literature, especially such a timeless novel that is read by so many, is of great significance; it provides those without a mental illness an opportunity to see it and understand one through the eyes of someone who has it, and it affirms those with a mental illness that they are not alone, and they have nothing to be ashamed of. Accurate portrayal of a mental illness also combats ignorance on the subject, which saves many from unwarranted and undue criticism and hate, which should be the ultimate goal of this and any…

    • 1182 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    A Beautiful Mind is an inspiring story about triumph over schizophrenia, among the most devastating and disabling of all mental disorders. A Beautiful Mind succeeds in realistically describing the disturbed thinking, emotion, perception, and behavior that characterizes the disorder, and shows the difficult task of management of and/or recovery from the disorder. The movie communicates the vital importance of the factors that contributed to Nash's recovery and achievement of his amazing potential as a gifted intellectual. For instance, Nash was treated with dignity and respect by most of his academic peers. Social support and tolerance enabled him to regain his capacity for productive work that led to his receipt of the Nobel Prize for economics in 1994. His employer, Princeton University, went a long way to accommodate him and find a place for him in the academic community. Nash also benefited from the love and faith exhibited by his wife, Alicia. A Beautiful Mind credits the love and faith of Nash's wife, Alicia, as a significant factor in his recovery.…

    • 792 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Powerful Essays

    In the year 2001 the movie A Beautiful Mind was released as a biography of the life of John Nash. As the movie flows, we can easily see how his condition, schizophrenia, interferes with his personal life as well as with his home life and social life. The movie does a good job in describing Nash’s experiences and some of the help that put him back on his feet, and that motivated him to stay strong.…

    • 1469 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Powerful Essays
  • Satisfactory Essays

    1. The symptoms of schizophrenia John Nash showed in the beginning of the movie was hallucinations, and delusions.…

    • 327 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Satisfactory Essays
  • Good Essays

    John Nash Schizophrenia

    • 773 Words
    • 4 Pages

    John Nash, a brilliant man, wise beyond most men. I was very intrigued by the film’s portrayal of Mr. Nash. Despite having knowledge based on our textbook and power point slides concerning Schizophrenia, I lack knowledge and experience with someone who suffers from this complicated condition. This film depicted an in-depth, personal account of schizophrenia and the reality of their delusions (Howard, 2002). I can only imagine the pain and anguish one must feel when realizing that their delusions are not real. This film helped me to see Mr. Nash as a person dealing with this disease instead of a list of signs and symptoms from a textbook.…

    • 773 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Good Essays

Related Topics