A Beautiful Mind

Satisfactory Essays
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“A Beautiful Mind” application assignment
As you have learned in class, schizophrenia can be an extremely debilitating mental disorder. A Beautiful Mind chronicles the life of Nobel Prize winner Dr. John Nash, a world-renowned mathematician who suffered from schizophrenia. Fill out the questions below using appropriate examples from the film. 1.) Individuals who suffer from Schizophrenia usually exhibit positive or negative symptoms. What are positive symptoms? What are negative symptoms?

What positive symptoms does John Nash experience in the film?

What negative symptoms does John Nash experience in the film?

2.) John Nash suffers from “paranoid schizophrenia,” which includes both delusions and hallucinations. What are delusions? What are hallucinations?

What delusions does John Nash experience in the film?

What hallucinations does John Nash experience in the film?

3.) Other forms of schizophrenia may also include flat affect, word salad, or catatonia. Does John Nash demonstrate any of these? If so, which ones? Provide an example. (you need to talk about at least one of the three)

4.) What are five (5) possible causes of schizophrenia? Based on what you see from the film, which do you think was most likely the cause of John Nash developing the disorder?

5.) In order to be classified as a psychological disorder, an individual must demonstrate behavior that is “deviant,” “distressful,” and “dysfunctional.” What does it mean to be deviant? In what way is John Nash deviant?

What does it mean to be distressful?

In what way is John Nash distressful?

What does it mean to be dysfunctional?

In what way is John Nash dysfunctional?

6.) During the film, John undergoes electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) as a “treatment” for his schizophrenia. Do you think this extreme measure was ethical? Why or why not?

7.) What is one difference between the real John Nash and the John Nash depicted in the film? You will need to

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