Yes we can

Good Essays
Topics: Islam, Ali
On the other hand, Shia Muslims share the belief that leadership should have stayed within the Prophet's own family, among those specifically appointed by him, or among Imams appointed by God Himself. Shia Muslims believe that following the Prophet Muhammad's death, leadership should have passed directly to his cousin/son-in-law, Ali. Throughout history, Shia Muslims have not recognized the authority of elected Muslim leaders, choosing instead to follow a line of Imams which they believe have been appointed by the Prophet Muhammad or God Himself. The word "Shia" in Arabic means a group or supportive party of people. The commonly-known term is shortened from the historical "Shia-t-Ali," or "the Party of Ali." They are also known as followers of "Ahl-al-Bayt" or "People of the Household" (of the Prophet). From this initial question of political leadership, some aspects of spiritual life have been affected and now differ between the two groups of Muslims. Differences in beliefs Shia Muslims believe that the Imam is sinless by nature, and that his authority is infallible as it comes directly from God. Therefore, Shia Muslims often venerate the Imams as saints and perform pilgrimages to their tombs and shrines in the hopes of divine intercession. Sunni Muslims counter that there is no basis in Islam for a hereditary privileged class of spiritual leaders, and certainly no basis for the veneration or intercession of saints. Sunni Muslims contend that leadership of the community is not a birthright, but a trust that is earned and which may be given or taken away by the people themselves. Shia Muslims also feel animosity towards some of the companions of the Prophet Muhammad, based on their positions and actions during the early years of discord about leadership in the community. Many of these companions (Abu Bakr, Umar, Aisha, etc.) have narrated traditions about the Prophet's life and spiritual practice. Shia Muslims reject these traditions (hadith) and do

You May Also Find These Documents Helpful

  • Good Essays

    Yes We Can

    • 1472 Words
    • 6 Pages

    Greg Oberschelp CAS 137 1 PM Dr. Freymiller “Yes We Can” The word rhetoric is widely thrown around by many different people in today’s age. Many people don’t understand the real context of the word, but that does not mean it is not any less common. Rhetoric is all around us, whether it is on television, in a paper, or, just in an advertisement. For most people, rhetoric is most widely seen during election season, especially during the Presidential election. Candidates rely…

    • 1472 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Yes we can

    • 3336 Words
    • 14 Pages

    progress and change expose themselves to criticism. Yet there is always a subtle danger in life's improvements and refinements, a drawback or disadvantage that occurs along with the benefits of progress. It sometimes seems that we devote half of our time to making what we call "improvements"—in our lives, our work, our relationships—but so often the original conditions had some quality that is lost in the process of change. Adapted from E.B. White, "Progress and Change" Assignment: Does improvement…

    • 3336 Words
    • 14 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Yes We Can by Obama

    • 914 Words
    • 4 Pages

    trenches foot Structure of speech Way he delivers the speech and its impact In my essay I will be analysing the speech, “Yes we can” by Barrack Obama. The speech is to persuade the people of America that their quality of life can be improved. Barrack Obama portrays this by using various persuasive techniques to interest his audience and his famous quote, “Yes we can” Obama uses illusion in his speech by referring to “Anne Nixon Cooper who is a hundred and six years old” to show how extraordinary…

    • 914 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Powerful Essays

    The Rhetoric of “Yes We Can” Darío Villanueva outlines the history and significance of the rhetorical tradition and highlights the striking persistence of the power of the word in American politics. Even in our high-tech age, a three-word tagline -"Yes We Can"- carries devastating clout. The Greek sophists -the original masters of rhetoric, notorious for their appetite for influence rather than truth- would be both impressed by the abiding power of their art, and dismayed that, in the Gutenberg…

    • 6906 Words
    • 20 Pages
    Powerful Essays
  • Good Essays

    analyze the political ad titled “Yes We Can.” The ad aired during the 2008 presidential campaign, Barack Obama vs. John McCain. This paper will first describe the political context of the ad, second describe the ad itself, and finally make an argument about why the ad was effective. This ad was effective and has become famous because of the use and continuous repetition of these three simple words that can inspire a generation, unite a community, and move a nation: “yes we can.” Throughout time this slogan…

    • 804 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Barack Obama 'Yes We Can'

    • 352 Words
    • 2 Pages

    "yes we can" is one of the most influential phrases in the speeches of barrack obama, But this 10-min speech blew me away. This was a scripted speech, and one of the best written and delivered I have seen in some time. this short speech had it all: simple but eloquent and powerful language, and a strong yet upbeat, friendly delivery. I think that Barack Obama’s Victory speech was extremely inspiring, motivating, and most of all in my opinion comforting to a rehabilitating nation in dire need…

    • 352 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Courtney Lee Kate Reed English 15 September 2001 “Yes We Can” On a cold, Chicago night, newly elected President Barack Obama warmed the hearts of Americans as he presented his “Election Night Remarks.” He spoke with intended gratitude, thanking those who made his victory possible, changing the minds of his opposition, and marking the start of his term with a sense of hope. His passionate speech evoked patriotism in every person through his use of repetition, personal relation, and allusions…

    • 732 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Yes We Can by Barack Obama In Obama’s campaign speech presented on January 8th 2008 there are continuous techniques that he uses to persuade the audience to vote for him. He slowly establishes a rapport to create a sense of equality between him and the audience; he does this by using first person plural, such as ‘we’ which is effective because it makes all the people feel united and as if he is directly talking to them as a person. He also uses abstract nouns like ‘hope’ to make an emotional…

    • 519 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Senator McCain is an approachable and nice person was not as strong as Obama’s smile during his “Yes We Can” speech. Throughout the speeches, Senator Obama appeared as a more thankful and appreciative person compared to Senator McCain. Senator McCain briefly glossed over his thankfulness of what his voters have done. He only thanked them briefly, while Senator Obama spent a long portion of his “Yes We Can” speech on thanking his supporters and showing them how thankful he is for their support. This…

    • 1292 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Powerful Essays

    Yes I Can

    • 15037 Words
    • 61 Pages

    RECIPROCAL NATURE OF THE PROBLEM The traditional approach has tended to obscure the nature of the choice that has to be made. The question is commonly thought of as one in which A inflicts harm on B and what has to be decided is: how should we restrain A? But this is wrong. We are dealing with a problem of a reciprocal nature. To avoid the harm to, B would inflict harm on A. The real question that has to be decided is: should A be allowed to harm B or should B be allowed to harm A? The problem is to avoid…

    • 15037 Words
    • 61 Pages
    Powerful Essays