World War 1

Topics: World War I, World War II / Pages: 11 (2721 words) / Published: Sep 16th, 2013
Lindsey Stegemoller
April 23, 2012
Greene
ENG102
The Great War The time was 1914. Europe was a thermometer with skyrocketing temperatures of tension. As countries began declaring war on each other in Europe, troops began to mobilize for what they thought would be a traditionally fought war: the British cavalry leading the Entente to a decisive victory. How were the European powers to know that this massive war would be fought entirely in the ground with surprise attacks and innovative technology that changed the meaning of “war” forever? World War I (The Great War) was unique from any other war in history because of the development of modern chemical weaponry, the way soldiers fought, and the post-war dealings. In past wars, large cannons and manual guns were used to defeat the enemy. World War I brought about major chemical and machine innovation. The use of airplanes and tanks greatly influenced the decisive victory of the Allied Powers. The development of modern chemical weaponry in the 20th century greatly impacted the outcome of the war because soldiers had never before seen such a harmful weapon used to destroy massive amounts of people. Some historians call the Great War the chemist’s war because of the many innovations in science and chemical weaponry (Fitzgerald). The use of various gases during the stalemate would kill of the enemy quick and allow the other side to gain ground. One of the first gases used to attack was chlorine gas used by the Germans against the French. The Germans placed over 6,000 steel cylinders along their side and waited for the correct wind pattern to release the gas. Each cylinder was filled with pressurized liquid chlorine and completely terrorized the French who did not expect such a horrifying weapon.

“[I watched] figures running wildly in confusion over the fields. Greenish-gray clouds swept down upon them, turning yellow as they traveled over the country blasting everything they touched and



Cited: Ashworth, A. E. “The Sociology of Trench Warfare 1914-18.” British Journal Of Sociology 19.4 (1968): 407. SocINDEX with Full Text. Web. 23 April. 2012 Girard, Marion. “Political Decisions And Britain’s Chemical Warfare Challenge in World War I: Descend to Atrocities?” Defense Studies 8.1 (2008): 105-132. Academic Search Premier. Web. 24 April. 2012 Fitzgerald, GJ. “Chemical Warfare And Medical Response During World War I.” American Journal of Public Health, 98.4 (2008): 611-625. CINAHL Plus with Full Text. Web. 22 April. 2012. Mandel, Robert. “Chemical Warfare: Act Of Intimidation Or Desperation?” Armed Forces & Society 19.2 (1993): 187-208. Military & Government Collection. Web. 24 April. 2012. Rumerman, J. "The US Aircraft Industry During WWI." U.S. Centennial of Flight Commission. Web. 1 May 2012. Throntveit, Trygve. “The Fable of the Fourteen Points: Woodrow Wilson and National Self-Determination.” Diplomatic History 35.3 (2011): 445-481. Academic Search Premier. Web. 21 April. 2012. “Trench Warfare.” Britannica Concise Encyclopedia. Chicago: Encyclopedia Britannica (2009). Credo Reference. Web. 21 April. 2012. Trueman, C. "Tanks of World War One." historylearnigsite.co.uk 2000. Web. 1 May 2012. “World War I.” Encyclopedia of Violence, Peace, and Conflict. Oxford: Elsevier Science And Technology, (2008): Credo Reference. Web. 22 April. 2012.

You May Also Find These Documents Helpful

  • World war 1
  • World War 1
  • World War 1
  • World War 1
  • World War 1
  • world war 1
  • World War 1
  • World War 1
  • World War 1
  • World War 1