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Working with Children & Young People Level Mu 2.4

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OP 2.15
1.1. Produce a leaflet to describe why communication, language are important to children's learning.
Communication, language and literacy is the most important skill you can give to your children, it underpins every other learning experience they will have throughout their lives. Without being able to communicate successfully, children will struggle to make the most of the experiences that come their way. We as practitioners must support children’s learning and competence in communicating, speaking and listening, being read to and beginning to read and write. We must also provide children with the confidence, opportunity, encouragement, support them to use their skills in a range of situations and for a range of purposes.The development and use of communication and language are at the heart of young children’s learning. Learning to listen and speak emerge out of non-verbal communication, which includes body language such as facial expression, eye contact, bending the head to listen, hand gesture, and taking turns. These skills develop as babies and young children express their needs and feelings, interact with others and establish their own identities and personalities.The ability to communicate gives children the capacity to participate more fully in their society. Babies respond differently to some sounds than others and from an early age are able to distinguish sound patterns. They use their voices to make contact and to let people know what they need and how they feel. Music and dance also play a key role in language development for young children. Rhymes and songs are particularly important and enjoyable for babies. At first, all learning arises from physical action and the gathering of experience through the senses. Therefore, children learn best when activities engage many senses. Initially their attempts to communicate will be non-verbal. As there language develops and young children learn about conversation, thought play becomes less dependent on action.As children develop speaking and listening skills, they build the foundations for reading and writing. They need lots of opportunities to interact with others as they develop these skills, and to use a wide range of resources for making early progress in reading, mark making and writing.
Some children with autism find it hard to communicate, as they are non verbal. They communicate sometimes through bad behaviour, as they are trying to tell someone what they want but are unable to do this, because of no speech.They could use signs and symbols of a way of communicating there needs, this would help with the language barrier and then could help with ways that they could learn.

1.2 Describe how communication, language and literacy links with other areas of learning and development within the curriculum framework in your setting ?

In my setting they use the Early Years Foundation Stage.The requirements are the children's learning and competence in Language for communication,Language for speaking, language for thinking, linking with sounds and letters, reading and writing, Handwriting. Communication can be using facial expressions, hand gestures, using signs and symbols if we are non-verbal. Our reading to, and beginning to read and write must be supported and extended. The children must be provided with opportunity and encouragement to use there skills in a range of situations and for a range of purposes, and be supported in developing the confidence and disposition to do so. Communication and being with other children will help them build up social relationships with children and adults,both one to one and in small groups, sharing emotions,and helps to participate fully in society. Being more sensitive to the needs of children whom English is an additional language.A child that is secure, confident and knows how to manage their behaviour is more likely to develop friendships, and will achieve well, and also be able to cope better with life's setback.
Also linking communication with sounds and letters.
Handwriting starts by making marks, then drawing develops this is a basic for recognising letters which will link in with the personal,social and emotional development.
Babies use sounds too communicate and make their feeling known with different sound patterns. The more you talk to them the quicker they will talk.
Children learn through doing activities and experiencing different activities that engage in them using all there senses, using music, dance, rhymes and songs and play a important role to their language development.
As the child develops speaking and listening skills this will build the foundation for literacy, which will help them making sense of visual and verbal signs and ultimately for reading and writing as everywhere we look you see words.
This area of learning includes communication,speaking and listening in different situations and for different situations, and for different purposes, being read a wide range of books and reading simple texts, and writing for a variety of purposes.
Being a good role model for language skills which will help the children with their emotions, thinking, learning, and sense of personal identity.

2.1 Identify the type of equipment and activities that are used to support children's communication,language,and literacy.

Sand and water play
Playing with clay.
 telling stories
 songs
 poems
 finger play

Outdoor toys – bikes, scooters, prams, bouncing ball etc. Hoops. (dancing, spinning with hoops, rolling hoops, jumping in hoops)
P.E. session. (stretching, running, jumping, crawling, bending etc.) Obstacle relay race. (ropes, been bags, cones, hoops, scarves, bats, balls, tyres.)
Gardening.
Climbing apparatus.
Tunnels.
Slides.
Obstacle scooter race. Egg & spoon race.
One Mile track. ( choose a different leader for each lap. Go around the track
Either singing (grand old duke of York), hopping, jumping, running etc. Whatever the child chooses!
Sports day.
Trip to the park.
Singing and dancing. ( action songs such as head, shoulders, knees & toes.)
Hop scotch.
Organised party games. (Musical statues & chairs)
Disco.
Warm Ups. (Mr man game. Mr Jelly- wobble like a jelly etc)

2.2. How to engage children's interest and attention in communication,language and literacy activities through a verity of activities

Children's development should always be viewed holistically, as each area of development is linked with and affects other areas of development. To engage children in activities through a variety of methods, here a a few examples.

X telling stories reading aloud, a natural way to give two way communication eg. Talking and listening.
X. Games and puzzles are used to so the children use the language that is necessary to take part in the game eg, I spy, spot the difference.
X songs help children to learn new words in a fun way. Songs also encourage and help children's talking and listening skills. Make the songs fun, by making sounds and different voices also using actions. Make sure that all children are included,cby giving lots of encouragement.
X. Use language with physical movement eg, like the wheels on the bus, or inch wincy spider.
X poems
X finger plays playing with puppets and props, eg, dolls are used so the child can express themselves verbally. Props like masks with dressing up clothes help them to act out roles in their own way.
X. Imaginative play in the home corner eg, shops, hospital,vets or garden centre, by using a variety of language to communicate, also using dressing up clothes, hats, etc.
X. Playing games in pairs, or group. Which help the children take turns, eg, board games and computer games.
X. Collage work and making models.
X. Sand and water play.
X Chinese whispers. This is more appropriate for older children.
X. Circle activities where the children are in a group and take turns, use language to express themselves and their thoughts, feelings, and ideas. The children will gain confidence as they communicate more and feel comfortable, this will help with children that are withdrawn and shy.

2.3. Use clear language to support children's learning in communication, language and literacy.

Saying please and thank you.
Use clear concise language which will help the child to learn.
When talking to the children make sure you have their attention.
Show children what you are talking about.
Use plain language appropriate to the child's level of understanding and development, and simple sentences.
Use repetition to reinforce or introduce new ideas
Maintain eye contact.
Get down to the child's level.
Use non- verbal communication by nodding and smiling.
Model the correct grammar.
Turn taking in language exchange.
Ask open questions.
Let the children initiate conversation and listen to what they have to say.
Share books, stories and rhymes with babies and young children.
Use appropriate body language, gestures and facial expressions.

2.4. Use encouragement and praise when supporting children's learning in communication,language and literacy
To give lots of praise and encouragement when supporting the children in communication,language and literacy.
Be a good role model so that the children continue what you are trying to achieve with them.
With children that do have communication problems use signs and symbols, as a means of praising them.
Use stickers or rewards when the child has reach their goal.
Use facial expressions.
Lots of reassurance for a child that is not as confident as some children, which will boast their self esteem.

OP 2.7 contribute to support of children's creative development.

1.1 Describe why creative development is important to children’s learning.

Children’s creativity must be extended by the provision of support for their curiosity, exploration and play. They must be provided with opportunities to exploring, discovery,experimental and sensory development and to share their thoughts, ideas and feelings, for example, through a variety of art, music, movement, dance, imaginative and role-play activities, mathematics, and design and technology. (EYFS)

What Creative Development means for children

Creativity is about taking risks and making connections and is strongly linked to play.
Creativity emerges as children become absorbed in action and explorations of their own ideas, expressing them through movement, making and transforming things using media and materials such as crayons, paints, scissors, words, sounds, movement, props and make-believe.
Creativity involves children in initiating their own learning and making choices and decisions.
Children’s responses to what they see, hear and experience through their senses are individual and the way they represent their experiences is unique and valuable
Being creative enables babies and children to explore many processes, media and materials and to make things.
The role of the adult is vital,adults need to plan experiences that actively encourage the development of skills knowledge and positive attitude to enable children to explore and discover and express their creativity. These opportunities help children to make connections and achieve a new understanding about the world around them.

1.2 Describe how creative development links in to other areas of learning and development within the curriculum framework in your setting.

Creative play supports children's personal social and emotional development as it gives them the opportunities to express their thinking and feelings.
Ensuring that children have the opportunities to join in with others and turn taking, relationships.
Knowledge and understanding of the world- exploring, play and seek meaning in their experiences.
Providing materials that support particular learning.
Exploring media and materials- children becoming more independent and exploring and engaging with a wider range of materials, finding out about their colour, texture,shape, space.
Physical development - through movement, using scissors, brushes,awareness of personal space, using a range of materials, and equipment.
Creative play provides all kinds of opportunities for children's language development they will talk with the adults and other children about what they are doing.

2.1 identify types of equipment and activities that are used to support creative development.

Natural materials - clay, woodwork, sand, water, twigs, leaves,feathers,paper
Outdoor toys – bikes, scooters, prams, bouncing ball etc. Hoops. (dancing, spinning with hoops, rolling hoops, jumping in hoops)
P.E. session. (stretching, running, jumping, crawling, bending etc.) Obstacle relay race. (ropes, been bags, cones, hoops, scarves, bats, balls, tyres.)
Gardening.
Climbing apparatus.
Tunnels.
Slides.
Obstacle scooter race. Egg & spoon race.
One Mile track. ( choose a different leader for each lap. Go around the track
Either singing (grand old duke of York), hopping, jumping, running etc. Whatever the child chooses!
Sports day.
Trip to the park.
Singing and dancing. ( action songs such as head, shoulders, knees & toes.)
Hop scotch.
Organised party games. (Musical statues & chairs)
Disco.
Warm Ups. (Mr man game. Mr Jelly- wobble like a jelly etc).
Music sessions. - circle time.
Drama and imaginative play - imagining you are in a shop, or on a boat, or an office.
Painting and drawing - using a range of paint brushes, and different colours of paint, and mix different colours of paint to make more colours, and a range of different types of paper
Wooden block play
Role play area - playing with hand puppets, help the children with their imagination, they are able to pretend to be someone their not ( fantasy ),but need to understand what is fantasy and what is reality.

2.2 Set out implement creative activities with children.
Collage work - with different types of fabric, paper, wallpaper, tissue, glue, scissors ( left handed and right handed ones) and easy grip scissors, pencils,
All the resources were put on the table the children helped to put them there.
The activity was about animals that were found in water or around water areas. The children had the choices of choosing whatever they wanted to do with there collage, and to use their imagination to do this.
The table was set out this way because it was easier for the children to see what resources there were to use, and they could choose what they wanted to do, there was
A variety of different resources to use, this was left up to the children.
Other creative activities were playing in the home corner, we made a boat using some sides of boarding, used for the size of the boat. The children got some chairs and put the chairs in between the boards. One of the children got a captains hat from the dressing up box and we went on a adventure.The children set out this way as they wanted it to look as much like a boat as we could make it.

2.3 Use clear language to support children's learning in creative development.

Make sure you have the child's attention.
Maintain eye contact - getting down to their level and speak in short simple sentences, using the appropriate vocabulary. If the question needs repeating then repeat it.
Use non verbal communication as well as verbal, nodding or smiling.
Or using signs and symbols if the child has a learning disability, or communication problem.
Model the correct grammar, bounce back the correct grammar to the child.
Adapt the way you speak to the individual child this should be appropriate to their development. When speaking to babies and toddlers this should repeat key words and keep the sentences short.

2.4. Use encouragement and praise when supporting children's creative development.

When a child has never done a creative activity before. Give loads of positive praise, eg, well done ---- that's really good trying, excellent work. Well ----- that's really fantastic work well done. Well done ---- that's super work.

MU 2.4

2.1- Explain why a safe but challenging environment is important for children and young people.

We as carers need to provide safe, positive and educational environments so that children can grow in a positive manner. Children need the challenges so that they can develop skills and their characters to help them become independent, and so they can try out new things and but the environment needs to be safe so that children can learn in a positive way. learning how to negotiate natural hazards such as ice, tree -roots, rocks or slippery leaves developing skill in negotiating the physical environments of home and early years setting learning how to use tools and equipment safely and purposefully developing control and coordination of their bodies. Social and moral risk and challenge developing an understanding of the expectations and rules within different social settings developing reasoning skills learning to negotiate with others, including learning to say ‘no’ to others.
Intellectual risk and challenge trying out new ideas and being willing to ‘have a go’ solving problems being resourceful, inventive and creative.
Early years practitioners have a responsibility to ensure that they offer children all these opportunities.

Why do children need to experience risk and challenge

Everyday life always involves a degree of risk and children need to learn how to cope with this. They need to understand that the world can be a dangerous place and that care needs to be taken when negotiating their way round it. Inevitably the most powerful learning comes from not understanding or misjudging the degree of risk. Similarly the toddler who ignores the warning, ‘Don’t touch, it’s hot’, and feels what ‘hot’ means, is not likely to make the same mistake again. Being told about possible dangers is not enough – children need to see or experience the consequences of not taking care. If we observe young children, we can see that, from an early age, they are motivated to take risks – they want to learn to walk, climb, ride a tricycle – and are not put off by the inevitable spills and tumbles they experience as they are developing coordination and control. In early years settings children find their own, often quite ingenious, physical challenges and, in doing so, learn about their own strengths and limitations. The Children who are sheltered from risk and challenge when young will not be able to make judgments about their own capabilities and will not be well equipped to resist peer pressure in their later years.
Children who learn in their early years to make their own reasoned decisions rather than simply doing what they are told to by others will be in a stronger position to resist the pressures they will inevitably face as they reach their teenage years. In contrast, overprotected children may well make reckless decisions which put them in physical or moral danger.

Managing risk and challenge

There is a danger that many adults, who are afraid that children might hurt themselves, simply remove objects and equipment rather than teach children how to use them safely. These adults need to get risk into perspective. As Jennie Lindon points out: ‘…no environment will ever be 100% safe. Even well-supervised children manage to hurt themselves, often in unpredictable ways.’ (Lindon, 1999) Additionally, if the environment becomes unstimulating children will inevitably become bored and behaviour will deteriorate. In Learning Outdoors, Helen Bilton highlights that: ‘Without challenges and risks, children will find play areas uninteresting or use them in inappropriate ways, which become dangerous.’ (Bilton, 2005).

4.1 identify the signs and symptoms which may indicate that a child or young person is injured or unwell.

As a teaching or learning support assistant, you will work closely with individual children. You are therefore likely to notice when they are unwell and may be incubating an illness. This can take place over a period of days. You may notice that a child, that
Look pale.
Have a raised temperature or fever. X. Persistent coughing.
Diarrhoea X. Discharge from the ear.
Vomiting X. Seizures.
A baby or child that is constantly crying. X. Cut.
A child that refuses to eat. X. Falls
A child that is lethargy or floppiness. X. Grazes.
A child that looks flushed and has a rash.
Dark rings around the eyes.

4.2 identify circumstances when children may need urgent medical attention.
See page T15 (2.3).

4.3 Outline own role and responsibilities in the event of a child or young person requiring urgent medical attention.

As I am on placement the following procedure is what I have to follow.
Stay calm. Check the area for safety, Check the child's breathing, and give first aid treatment if possible.
I have to ask another staff member to stay with the other child to keep them calm.I would ask another staff member if their was one available to ring the emergency services.
Fill all the relevant forms out, ring the child's parents and tell them what has happened and tell them any treatment that has been given, and the name of the person that has given the treatment,If the child's parents are going to take a while to get to the school then get the head teacher to take the child to the hospital. Reassure the child at all times.

5.1 describe the reporting procedure for accidents,incidents,emergencies and illnesses.
Paediatric first aid (1.4) page A4.

5.2 The recording procedure for accidents, incidents, emergencies and illnesses.

For a any kind of incident or accidents you would fill in a accident/ incident form, this is then recorded on a
SR 35 incident/ accident/ assault report form. Which will include the child's name, the date and time of the incident, where the accident/ incident happened, what exactly happened, and what injury occurred,What treatment was given, Name of the person giving the treatment,Another signature of witness to the report, A signature from the parent. The incident / accident book is found in the head teachers room in a locked cupboard.
For a child that has been I'll while they have been at school, the procedure is that the child goes to see the first aides on site, to see how they are feeling. If the child has sickness or diarrhoea, then the teacher, or first aider would ring their parents, then they would stay with the child until their parent/ Carer would come to pick them up.

6.1 outline procedures for infection control in own work setting.

The setting has to be safe and hygienic, all equipment must be kept clean, so that the staff take measures to control infection spreading.
Wearing the right protective clothing, wash your hands before preparing any food.
The storage of food is kept in the kitchen area, all the cold item are kept in the fridge.
Preparation of the food is done in the kitchen, using the correct food boards to the food that you are preparing. Use the right cloth for cleaning the tables, get the children to wash their hand before they have anything to eat. Use utensils to serve the food, so that you don't have any physical contact with it.
Personal care and hygiene - wearing the disposable apron and disposable gloves, wash hands before hand and put on all your protective wear before doing any personal care.
When you have changed the nappy, put in a yellow bin provided by the county council, they will pics pose of this. Clean the area afterwards, and get rid of your apron and gloves, then I always wash my hands again.
Administering first aid treatments.- disposable gloves when doing any first aid.and apron if needed.dispose of any body fluid in a yellow bin, or if it's a sharp in a sharps box.

6.2 personal protective clothing that is used to prevent the spread of infection. Disposable Gloves and Apron, for doing personal care of the children.

6.3 what the protective items are used for.
The apron is worn to cover the main part of the body.
Disposable gloves are worn to protect your hands from the spread of infection.

6.5 Safe disposal of waste to avoid the spread of infection.
Protect yourself when doing this.
Dispose of the waste safely and hygienically in the yellow bins provided.
Clear up any spillages immediately wearing the right protective clothing, and using the right product for getting rid of it.
When a child has soiled, always put the soiled clothing in a plastic bad and pass it to the parent when they collect the child.

7.1 continued, medications are kept in a locked fridge,
A child's inhaler is more access able, these are kept in the class room, so that it is easily acceptable as it may need to be used by the child.
Epipen is kept in the head masters room, in the child's box, with their picture on.
When it comes to sun cream, the child has to administer this themselves, they are kept in the child's bag or the class teacher keeps it in the class room in a cupboard.
When the child has diabetes they have a Box also in the head teachers room with their picture on it. The diebetic checks are done by first aiders, through the day, if their blood sugars drop then they are allowed to have a biscuit or lucazade.
When a child has to take tablets for anything, these are stored in the first aiders room in a cupboard, and are given out when the child is either fetched to take them or the child comes for their medication, mainly at dinner time.
The parents have the relevant forms to fill in to give permission for this to be administered before this procedure can take place.
The child has a red sheet. With the medication written on it, and when it is administer, this is then signed to say it has been given.

OP 2.15
1.1. Produce a leaflet to describe why communication, language are important to children's learning.
Communication, language and literacy is the most important skill you can give to your children, it underpins every other learning experience they will have throughout their lives. Without being able to communicate successfully, children will struggle to make the most of the experiences that come their way. We as practitioners must support children’s learning and competence in communicating, speaking and listening, being read to and beginning to read and write. We must also provide children with the confidence, opportunity, encouragement, support them to use their skills in a range of situations and for a range of purposes.The development and use of communication and language are at the heart of young children’s learning. Learning to listen and speak emerge out of non-verbal communication, which includes body language such as facial expression, eye contact, bending the head to listen, hand gesture, and taking turns. These skills develop as babies and young children express their needs and feelings, interact with others and establish their own identities and personalities.The ability to communicate gives children the capacity to participate more fully in their society. Babies respond differently to some sounds than others and from an early age are able to distinguish sound patterns. They use their voices to make contact and to let people know what they need and how they feel. Music and dance also play a key role in language development for young children. Rhymes and songs are particularly important and enjoyable for babies. At first, all learning arises from physical action and the gathering of experience through the senses. Therefore, children learn best when activities engage many senses. Initially their attempts to communicate will be non-verbal. As there language develops and young children learn about conversation, thought play becomes less dependent on action.As children develop speaking and listening skills, they build the foundations for reading and writing. They need lots of opportunities to interact with others as they develop these skills, and to use a wide range of resources for making early progress in reading, mark making and writing.
Some children with autism find it hard to communicate, as they are non verbal. They communicate sometimes through bad behaviour, as they are trying to tell someone what they want but are unable to do this, because of no speech.They could use signs and symbols of a way of communicating there needs, this would help with the language barrier and then could help with ways that they could learn.

1.2 Describe how communication, language and literacy links with other areas of learning and development within the curriculum framework in your setting ?

In my setting they use the Early Years Foundation Stage.The requirements are the children's learning and competence in Language for communication,Language for speaking, language for thinking, linking with sounds and letters, reading and writing, Handwriting. Communication can be using facial expressions, hand gestures, using signs and symbols if we are non-verbal. Our reading to, and beginning to read and write must be supported and extended. The children must be provided with opportunity and encouragement to use there skills in a range of situations and for a range of purposes, and be supported in developing the confidence and disposition to do so. Communication and being with other children will help them build up social relationships with children and adults,both one to one and in small groups, sharing emotions,and helps to participate fully in society. Being more sensitive to the needs of children whom English is an additional language.A child that is secure, confident and knows how to manage their behaviour is more likely to develop friendships, and will achieve well, and also be able to cope better with life's setback.
Also linking communication with sounds and letters.
Handwriting starts by making marks, then drawing develops this is a basic for recognising letters which will link in with the personal,social and emotional development.
Babies use sounds too communicate and make their feeling known with different sound patterns. The more you talk to them the quicker they will talk.
Children learn through doing activities and experiencing different activities that engage in them using all there senses, using music, dance, rhymes and songs and play a important role to their language development.
As the child develops speaking and listening skills this will build the foundation for literacy, which will help them making sense of visual and verbal signs and ultimately for reading and writing as everywhere we look you see words.
This area of learning includes communication,speaking and listening in different situations and for different situations, and for different purposes, being read a wide range of books and reading simple texts, and writing for a variety of purposes.
Being a good role model for language skills which will help the children with their emotions, thinking, learning, and sense of personal identity.

2.1 Identify the type of equipment and activities that are used to support children's communication,language,and literacy.

Sand and water play
Playing with clay.
 telling stories
 songs
 poems
 finger play

Outdoor toys – bikes, scooters, prams, bouncing ball etc. Hoops. (dancing, spinning with hoops, rolling hoops, jumping in hoops)
P.E. session. (stretching, running, jumping, crawling, bending etc.) Obstacle relay race. (ropes, been bags, cones, hoops, scarves, bats, balls, tyres.)
Gardening.
Climbing apparatus.
Tunnels.
Slides.
Obstacle scooter race. Egg & spoon race.
One Mile track. ( choose a different leader for each lap. Go around the track
Either singing (grand old duke of York), hopping, jumping, running etc. Whatever the child chooses!
Sports day.
Trip to the park.
Singing and dancing. ( action songs such as head, shoulders, knees & toes.)
Hop scotch.
Organised party games. (Musical statues & chairs)
Disco.
Warm Ups. (Mr man game. Mr Jelly- wobble like a jelly etc)

2.2. How to engage children's interest and attention in communication,language and literacy activities through a verity of activities

Children's development should always be viewed holistically, as each area of development is linked with and affects other areas of development. To engage children in activities through a variety of methods, here a a few examples.

X telling stories reading aloud, a natural way to give two way communication eg. Talking and listening.
X. Games and puzzles are used to so the children use the language that is necessary to take part in the game eg, I spy, spot the difference.
X songs help children to learn new words in a fun way. Songs also encourage and help children's talking and listening skills. Make the songs fun, by making sounds and different voices also using actions. Make sure that all children are included,cby giving lots of encouragement.
X. Use language with physical movement eg, like the wheels on the bus, or inch wincy spider.
X poems
X finger plays playing with puppets and props, eg, dolls are used so the child can express themselves verbally. Props like masks with dressing up clothes help them to act out roles in their own way.
X. Imaginative play in the home corner eg, shops, hospital,vets or garden centre, by using a variety of language to communicate, also using dressing up clothes, hats, etc.
X. Playing games in pairs, or group. Which help the children take turns, eg, board games and computer games.
X. Collage work and making models.
X. Sand and water play.
X Chinese whispers. This is more appropriate for older children.
X. Circle activities where the children are in a group and take turns, use language to express themselves and their thoughts, feelings, and ideas. The children will gain confidence as they communicate more and feel comfortable, this will help with children that are withdrawn and shy.

2.3. Use clear language to support children's learning in communication, language and literacy.

Saying please and thank you.
Use clear concise language which will help the child to learn.
When talking to the children make sure you have their attention.
Show children what you are talking about.
Use plain language appropriate to the child's level of understanding and development, and simple sentences.
Use repetition to reinforce or introduce new ideas
Maintain eye contact.
Get down to the child's level.
Use non- verbal communication by nodding and smiling.
Model the correct grammar.
Turn taking in language exchange.
Ask open questions.
Let the children initiate conversation and listen to what they have to say.
Share books, stories and rhymes with babies and young children.
Use appropriate body language, gestures and facial expressions.

2.4. Use encouragement and praise when supporting children's learning in communication,language and literacy
To give lots of praise and encouragement when supporting the children in communication,language and literacy.
Be a good role model so that the children continue what you are trying to achieve with them.
With children that do have communication problems use signs and symbols, as a means of praising them.
Use stickers or rewards when the child has reach their goal.
Use facial expressions.
Lots of reassurance for a child that is not as confident as some children, which will boast their self esteem.

OP 2.7 contribute to support of children's creative development.

1.1 Describe why creative development is important to children’s learning.

Children’s creativity must be extended by the provision of support for their curiosity, exploration and play. They must be provided with opportunities to exploring, discovery,experimental and sensory development and to share their thoughts, ideas and feelings, for example, through a variety of art, music, movement, dance, imaginative and role-play activities, mathematics, and design and technology. (EYFS)

What Creative Development means for children

Creativity is about taking risks and making connections and is strongly linked to play.
Creativity emerges as children become absorbed in action and explorations of their own ideas, expressing them through movement, making and transforming things using media and materials such as crayons, paints, scissors, words, sounds, movement, props and make-believe.
Creativity involves children in initiating their own learning and making choices and decisions.
Children’s responses to what they see, hear and experience through their senses are individual and the way they represent their experiences is unique and valuable
Being creative enables babies and children to explore many processes, media and materials and to make things.
The role of the adult is vital,adults need to plan experiences that actively encourage the development of skills knowledge and positive attitude to enable children to explore and discover and express their creativity. These opportunities help children to make connections and achieve a new understanding about the world around them.

1.2 Describe how creative development links in to other areas of learning and development within the curriculum framework in your setting.

Creative play supports children's personal social and emotional development as it gives them the opportunities to express their thinking and feelings.
Ensuring that children have the opportunities to join in with others and turn taking, relationships.
Knowledge and understanding of the world- exploring, play and seek meaning in their experiences.
Providing materials that support particular learning.
Exploring media and materials- children becoming more independent and exploring and engaging with a wider range of materials, finding out about their colour, texture,shape, space.
Physical development - through movement, using scissors, brushes,awareness of personal space, using a range of materials, and equipment.
Creative play provides all kinds of opportunities for children's language development they will talk with the adults and other children about what they are doing.

2.1 identify types of equipment and activities that are used to support creative development.

Natural materials - clay, woodwork, sand, water, twigs, leaves,feathers,paper
Outdoor toys – bikes, scooters, prams, bouncing ball etc. Hoops. (dancing, spinning with hoops, rolling hoops, jumping in hoops)
P.E. session. (stretching, running, jumping, crawling, bending etc.) Obstacle relay race. (ropes, been bags, cones, hoops, scarves, bats, balls, tyres.)
Gardening.
Climbing apparatus.
Tunnels.
Slides.
Obstacle scooter race. Egg & spoon race.
One Mile track. ( choose a different leader for each lap. Go around the track
Either singing (grand old duke of York), hopping, jumping, running etc. Whatever the child chooses!
Sports day.
Trip to the park.
Singing and dancing. ( action songs such as head, shoulders, knees & toes.)
Hop scotch.
Organised party games. (Musical statues & chairs)
Disco.
Warm Ups. (Mr man game. Mr Jelly- wobble like a jelly etc).
Music sessions. - circle time.
Drama and imaginative play - imagining you are in a shop, or on a boat, or an office.
Painting and drawing - using a range of paint brushes, and different colours of paint, and mix different colours of paint to make more colours, and a range of different types of paper
Wooden block play
Role play area - playing with hand puppets, help the children with their imagination, they are able to pretend to be someone their not ( fantasy ),but need to understand what is fantasy and what is reality.

2.2 Set out implement creative activities with children.
Collage work - with different types of fabric, paper, wallpaper, tissue, glue, scissors ( left handed and right handed ones) and easy grip scissors, pencils,
All the resources were put on the table the children helped to put them there.
The activity was about animals that were found in water or around water areas. The children had the choices of choosing whatever they wanted to do with there collage, and to use their imagination to do this.
The table was set out this way because it was easier for the children to see what resources there were to use, and they could choose what they wanted to do, there was
A variety of different resources to use, this was left up to the children.
Other creative activities were playing in the home corner, we made a boat using some sides of boarding, used for the size of the boat. The children got some chairs and put the chairs in between the boards. One of the children got a captains hat from the dressing up box and we went on a adventure.The children set out this way as they wanted it to look as much like a boat as we could make it.

2.3 Use clear language to support children's learning in creative development.

Make sure you have the child's attention.
Maintain eye contact - getting down to their level and speak in short simple sentences, using the appropriate vocabulary. If the question needs repeating then repeat it.
Use non verbal communication as well as verbal, nodding or smiling.
Or using signs and symbols if the child has a learning disability, or communication problem.
Model the correct grammar, bounce back the correct grammar to the child.
Adapt the way you speak to the individual child this should be appropriate to their development. When speaking to babies and toddlers this should repeat key words and keep the sentences short.

2.4. Use encouragement and praise when supporting children's creative development.

When a child has never done a creative activity before. Give loads of positive praise, eg, well done ---- that's really good trying, excellent work. Well ----- that's really fantastic work well done. Well done ---- that's super work.

Diploma level 2 working with children & young people

MU 2.4

2.1- Explain why a safe but challenging environment is important for children and young people.

We as carers need to provide safe, positive and educational environments so that children can grow in a positive manner. Children need the challenges so that they can develop skills and their characters to help them become independent, and so they can try out new things and but the environment needs to be safe so that children can learn in a positive way. learning how to negotiate natural hazards such as ice, tree -roots, rocks or slippery leaves developing skill in negotiating the physical environments of home and early years setting learning how to use tools and equipment safely and purposefully developing control and coordination of their bodies. Social and moral risk and challenge developing an understanding of the expectations and rules within different social settings developing reasoning skills learning to negotiate with others, including learning to say ‘no’ to others.
Intellectual risk and challenge trying out new ideas and being willing to ‘have a go’ solving problems being resourceful, inventive and creative.
Early years practitioners have a responsibility to ensure that they offer children all these opportunities.

Why do children need to experience risk and challenge

Everyday life always involves a degree of risk and children need to learn how to cope with this. They need to understand that the world can be a dangerous place and that care needs to be taken when negotiating their way round it. Inevitably the most powerful learning comes from not understanding or misjudging the degree of risk. Similarly the toddler who ignores the warning, ‘Don’t touch, it’s hot’, and feels what ‘hot’ means, is not likely to make the same mistake again. Being told about possible dangers is not enough – children need to see or experience the consequences of not taking care. If we observe young children, we can see that, from an early age, they are motivated to take risks – they want to learn to walk, climb, ride a tricycle – and are not put off by the inevitable spills and tumbles they experience as they are developing coordination and control. In early years settings children find their own, often quite ingenious, physical challenges and, in doing so, learn about their own strengths and limitations. The Children who are sheltered from risk and challenge when young will not be able to make judgments about their own capabilities and will not be well equipped to resist peer pressure in their later years.
Children who learn in their early years to make their own reasoned decisions rather than simply doing what they are told to by others will be in a stronger position to resist the pressures they will inevitably face as they reach their teenage years. In contrast, overprotected children may well make reckless decisions which put them in physical or moral danger.

Managing risk and challenge

There is a danger that many adults, who are afraid that children might hurt themselves, simply remove objects and equipment rather than teach children how to use them safely. These adults need to get risk into perspective. As Jennie Lindon points out: ‘…no environment will ever be 100% safe. Even well-supervised children manage to hurt themselves, often in unpredictable ways.’ (Lindon, 1999) Additionally, if the environment becomes unstimulating children will inevitably become bored and behaviour will deteriorate. In Learning Outdoors, Helen Bilton highlights that: ‘Without challenges and risks, children will find play areas uninteresting or use them in inappropriate ways, which become dangerous.’ (Bilton, 2005).

4.1 identify the signs and symptoms which may indicate that a child or young person is injured or unwell.

As a teaching or learning support assistant, you will work closely with individual children. You are therefore likely to notice when they are unwell and may be incubating an illness. This can take place over a period of days. You may notice that a child, that
Look pale.
Have a raised temperature or fever. X. Persistent coughing.
Diarrhoea X. Discharge from the ear.
Vomiting X. Seizures.
A baby or child that is constantly crying. X. Cut.
A child that refuses to eat. X. Falls
A child that is lethargy or floppiness. X. Grazes.
A child that looks flushed and has a rash.
Dark rings around the eyes.

4.2 identify circumstances when children may need urgent medical attention.
See page T15 (2.3).

4.3 Outline own role and responsibilities in the event of a child or young person requiring urgent medical attention.

As I am on placement the following procedure is what I have to follow.
Stay calm. Check the area for safety, Check the child's breathing, and give first aid treatment if possible.
I have to ask another staff member to stay with the other child to keep them calm.I would ask another staff member if their was one available to ring the emergency services.
Fill all the relevant forms out, ring the child's parents and tell them what has happened and tell them any treatment that has been given, and the name of the person that has given the treatment,If the child's parents are going to take a while to get to the school then get the head teacher to take the child to the hospital. Reassure the child at all times.

5.1 describe the reporting procedure for accidents,incidents,emergencies and illnesses.
Paediatric first aid (1.4) page A4.

5.2 The recording procedure for accidents, incidents, emergencies and illnesses.

For a any kind of incident or accidents you would fill in a accident/ incident form, this is then recorded on a
SR 35 incident/ accident/ assault report form. Which will include the child's name, the date and time of the incident, where the accident/ incident happened, what exactly happened, and what injury occurred,What treatment was given, Name of the person giving the treatment,Another signature of witness to the report, A signature from the parent. The incident / accident book is found in the head teachers room in a locked cupboard.
For a child that has been I'll while they have been at school, the procedure is that the child goes to see the first aides on site, to see how they are feeling. If the child has sickness or diarrhoea, then the teacher, or first aider would ring their parents, then they would stay with the child until their parent/ Carer would come to pick them up.

6.1 outline procedures for infection control in own work setting.

The setting has to be safe and hygienic, all equipment must be kept clean, so that the staff take measures to control infection spreading.
Wearing the right protective clothing, wash your hands before preparing any food.
The storage of food is kept in the kitchen area, all the cold item are kept in the fridge.
Preparation of the food is done in the kitchen, using the correct food boards to the food that you are preparing. Use the right cloth for cleaning the tables, get the children to wash their hand before they have anything to eat. Use utensils to serve the food, so that you don't have any physical contact with it.
Personal care and hygiene - wearing the disposable apron and disposable gloves, wash hands before hand and put on all your protective wear before doing any personal care.
When you have changed the nappy, put in a yellow bin provided by the county council, they will pics pose of this. Clean the area afterwards, and get rid of your apron and gloves, then I always wash my hands again.
Administering first aid treatments.- disposable gloves when doing any first aid.and apron if needed.dispose of any body fluid in a yellow bin, or if it's a sharp in a sharps box.

6.2 personal protective clothing that is used to prevent the spread of infection. Disposable Gloves and Apron, for doing personal care of the children.

6.3 what the protective items are used for.
The apron is worn to cover the main part of the body.
Disposable gloves are worn to protect your hands from the spread of infection.

6.5 Safe disposal of waste to avoid the spread of infection.
Protect yourself when doing this.
Dispose of the waste safely and hygienically in the yellow bins provided.
Clear up any spillages immediately wearing the right protective clothing, and using the right product for getting rid of it.
When a child has soiled, always put the soiled clothing in a plastic bad and pass it to the parent when they collect the child.

7.1 continued, medications are kept in a locked fridge,
A child's inhaler is more access able, these are kept in the class room, so that it is easily acceptable as it may need to be used by the child.
Epipen is kept in the head masters room, in the child's box, with their picture on.
When it comes to sun cream, the child has to administer this themselves, they are kept in the child's bag or the class teacher keeps it in the class room in a cupboard.
When the child has diabetes they have a Box also in the head teachers room with their picture on it. The diebetic checks are done by first aiders, through the day, if their blood sugars drop then they are allowed to have a biscuit or lucazade.
When a child has to take tablets for anything, these are stored in the first aiders room in a cupboard, and are given out when the child is either fetched to take them or the child comes for their medication, mainly at dinner time.
The parents have the relevant forms to fill in to give permission for this to be administered before this procedure can take place.
The child has a red sheet. With the medication written on it, and when it is administer, this is then signed to say it has been given.

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