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Women In The Victorian Era

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Women In The Victorian Era
Historically,women have been discrimintaed against and deemed subservient creatures as they were forced to monopolise private spheres. In the 14th and 17th centuries women who were mwntally ill were considered witches;trials were conducted to prove their heresy.
The notion of insanity was replaced with the ideal that the mentally ill were wicked Satanist whom God shunned and aflicted with divine punishments.These ideals transcended generationsas wpmen in the Victorian Age were considered weak,fragile,and passive.Depressed women were often isolated and placed into obscurity.If women over stepped these bounds,they could easily be determined as hysteric and out of mind.In addition,the psychological issues of people of color was fragmented and

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