Women In The Igbo Society

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In a civilized society, the men treat the women nicely, people listen to their higher power, and their government has rules and consequences for breaking those rules. The United States is a civilized society because it has all of those things. In American society it is wrong to abuse anyone, people do what their religion tells them to do, and the government has laws and consequences, this makes the American Society civilized. The Igbo society is uncivilized because the men treat the women terribly, people do not always listen to their higher power, and the government does not have a good set of laws and consequences. In the Igbo society the way men treat the women make them uncivilized. The men treat the women terribly, they beat them and treat them like servants, and it is seen as normal. On many occasions Okonkwo beat his wife and no one cared or stood up for her. The text says “without further argument, Okonkwo gave her a sound beating and left her and her only daughter weeping” (Achebe, 1959, p.38). Okonkwo beating his wife is abuse and no one cares because …show more content…
For example, in the text when a man beat his wife really bad Odukwe says “... if he ever beats her again we shall cut off his genitals for him” (Achebe, 1959, p.92). The man was told that if he hurt his wife again he would face the consequences, but it took a lot for them to do anything, it took her having a miscarriage for anyone to really care. Also, the man did not really face any real consequences, he was only threatened. The women had no justice in this situation. The text says “Uzowulu should recover from his medicine come in the proper way to beg his wife to return she will do so in understanding that…” (Achebe, 1959, p.92). The women is being forced to go back with a man that hurt her really bad. There is no justice in this situation which is also

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