Women In Pop Culture Research Paper

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Women in Pop Culture

The average girl does not easily fit in to society’s view of women. It isn’t supermodels who watch reality television and read the articles on “getting a guy and dropping 20 pounds”(70). Media has become a partial cause to young girls getting eating disorders or plastic surgery just to become “prettier”. They want to become perfect.
Recently, I opened a magazine and started to flip through the pages. It wasn’t long before I started to notice that the majority of the women were tall, ridiculously thin, and scantily dressed. They looked flawless. Women are often evaluated on their looks. Sometimes this evaluation is from men, but it is more often coming from women. Women try to measure themselves up to other women they

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