Women's Movement-Inequality

Good Essays
Name: Geraldine Ramirez

Date: 5/06/13

Women's Movement
Notebook Topic: Inequality
Write your response to the following topic below. Your response should consist of at least 5 paragraphs in which you state your thesis, provide at least 3 supporting reasons for your opinion, and summarize your position on the topic.
Illustrate and discuss attitudes concerning male/female inequalities and the resulting gender standards and rights, such as jobs, pay, leadership, and education. Women’s rights were, by modern measures, rather limited ca. 1850, but women of that time were in a far better position than slaves. If a comparison is to be made, it would be better to compare their situation with minors but not in every respect. Women's education had been growing rapidly. In many parts of the country, girls were as likely as boys to have elementary and secondary education. By mid-century, the number of women with a college education was increasingly rapidly. These things were encouraged. Women as mothers were recognized to have an important role in educating their children. On the other hand, slaves were mostly discouraged from even learning to read. State laws often forbade it, in part to prevent their reading 'abolitionist propaganda' and getting ideas. For a slave to receive advanced education, however, was unthinkable. With respect to the government, women, though not having the same rights as white men, had far more in the way of legal rights than blacks did. They were considered U.S. citizens, unlike blacks, according to the Dred Scott Decision in 1857; this included such things as access to federal courts and the 'right of petition'. Also, their testimony was preferred over that of blacks. Slaves could not even raise certain charges in courts, or testify in certain situations. Even in places that allowed such things, no one believed them. Some support the "like slaves" argument by pointing out how much sooner former slaves were given the right

You May Also Find These Documents Helpful

  • Better Essays

    The Women's Movement

    • 2093 Words
    • 9 Pages

    The Women’s Movement The women’s rights movement was a huge turning point for women because they had succeeded in the altering of their status as a group and changing their lives of countless men and women. Gender, Ideology, and Historical Change: Explaining the Women’s Movement was a great chapter because it explained and analyzed the change and causes of the women’s movement. Elaine Tyler May’s essay, Cold War Ideology and the Rise of Feminism and Women’s Liberation and Sixties Radicalism…

    • 2093 Words
    • 9 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Good Essays

    Women's Movement

    • 984 Words
    • 4 Pages

    The Women’s Movement in Brazil Exhibiting courage and determination the women living in the Brazilian community of Gamboa de Baixo located in the city of Salvador, and in the state of Bahia, have accomplished significant changes in their fight for land ownership, clean water, gender and human rights. In the book Black Women Against the Land Grab: The Fight for Racial Justice in Brazil, Keisha-Khan Perry details the victories and sacrifices with passion and with a kindred spirit projecting her sisterhood…

    • 984 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    did not cover women’s sports recently. Also, the sports media industry is still dominated by men. According to Lapchick (2014) showed that 21 % of sports editors are women in 2014. Moreover According to the Zirin’s video “ Not just a game ” emphasized about the sports media industry only 1.9% in the women’s sports. Furthermore, there are inequality happening between men and women, such as media coverage and prize money. One female athlete and the team fought for these inequalities in the same era:…

    • 606 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Women's Inequality Within the Workplace “In 2015, only half of the world’s working-age women are in the labor force, compared to 77 percent of working-age men,” (MAKERS). Everyday, women face unequal circumstances and situations within the workplace. The average woman’s wage is significantly lower than their male colleagues. This would also mean that men have more job opportunities than women. All these disadvantages women face negatively affect their careers. The government has tried to decrease…

    • 1728 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Satisfactory Essays

    Prior to the women's movement, women were looked down upon socially, economically, and politically. Socially, women were seen as less superior than men, therefore they were prevented from claiming many rights. Individuals believed that their sole purpose in life was to cook, clean, and take care of the family. There were also minimal educational opportunities for women. Financially, women were discriminated against and given very few choices for occupations and their pay was low. Politically, women…

    • 134 Words
    • 1 Page
    Satisfactory Essays
  • Good Essays

    Women's Movement in India

    • 650 Words
    • 3 Pages

    The study of social movements is not an area for historians alone. Sociologists studying social structure, processes and change would logically be interested in social movements. It is a process through which a collective attempt is made at mobilisation for change or resistance. However, in the context of change it differs from evolutionary process of social mobility and change in the sense that movements are based on a perception of injustice or oppression of a certain section or sections…

    • 650 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Women's Rights Movement

    • 1049 Words
    • 5 Pages

    Social reform is a movement that seeks to change the social and political views of discounted groups. Social reform movements involve the discounted groups and activists in an effort to change political policy while bringing public awareness to the issue through protests, media, amended legislature, etc. The social reform movements from 1820-1860 were characterized by unyielding perfectionism, impatience with compromise, and distrust with established social institutions. These qualities explain the…

    • 1049 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Better Essays

    impacts such as gender equality and female government roles summarize the women's suffrage movement. There were many historical events that caused and progressed the women’s suffrage movement. The first of these was the African- American Men’s Rights amendment. This was the fifteenth amendment that gave rights to African-…

    • 1792 Words
    • 8 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Powerful Essays

    Women's Rights Movement

    • 3386 Words
    • 14 Pages

    was Elizabeth Cady Stanton. Stanton dedicated her entire life to the women's movement, despite the opposition she received, from both her family and friends. In the course of this paper, I will be taking a critical look at three of Stanton's most acclaimed speeches "Declaration of Sentiments", "Solitude of Self", and " Home Life", and develop a claim that the rhetoric in these speeches was an effective tool in advancing the movement as a whole. Elizabeth Cady Stanton was born November 12, 1815, in Johnstown…

    • 3386 Words
    • 14 Pages
    Powerful Essays
  • Good Essays

    Xxxxxxx U.S History 2 Dr. Tyrone Tilery April 30, 2015 The Women’s Movement of the 1920’s A woman in the 1920’s had experienced many different societies and faces of the U.S. Following the First World War, social issues gained more recognition and the nineteenth amendment granted women the right to vote in 1920. This changed the way women were viewed and the way they viewed themselves. In America, a Narrative History by David E. Shi and George Brown Tindall, the history of the nineteen-twenties…

    • 926 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Good Essays