William Wordsworth's The World Is Too Much With Us

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William Wordsworth’s “The World Is Too Much With Us” bring attention to man’s alienation from nature. Wordsworth grew up in an environmentally focused community, so he has appreciation for nature, whereas others do not. In the poem, he brings up a problem within our society: people worry too much about materialistic things. Because nature is non-materialistic, we apparently overlook it. The use of diction and word play amplify Wordsworth’s message. He writes with an angry and disappointed tone and sprinkles in some irony when saying, “Great God! I’d rather be a Pagan suckled in a creed outworn”. He is saying that faith can be renewed by witnessing God’s creation, but instead we ignore it. The use of juxtaposition was also implemented to get

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