Widower In The Country Analysis

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Through poetry, Les Murray expresses the idea of death and loneliness with the use of two poems such as ‘Widower in the Country’ and ‘Once in a lifetime - Snow.’ He themes like loss, pain, joy and discovery and a few techniques: imagery and symbolism to convey his point(s). Therefore, a skilful selection and arrangement of words make poetry interesting, and Murray has conveyed this in his two poems.

‘Widower in the Country’ highlights the painful effect of a lonely husband who lost his wife due to death. This poem demonstrates how one’s life can be repeated into a routine when someone close passes away.The core of this poem used to describe this idea is loneliness and sadness, also the difference between living and surviving. The widower’s

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