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Why Did Johnson Lose Vietnam

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Why Did Johnson Lose Vietnam
In 1963, only hours after Lyndon B. Johnson had become the 36th President of the United States, his first words on the Vietnam War were “I’m not going to lose Vietnam. I’m not going to be the president who saw Southeast Asia become communist.” (CITE HERE) At the time, the United States was fighting to keep communism out of Southeast Asia. The main problem with President Johnson’s approach was sending bombs could carpet bomb miles of territory easily, Defoliants that killed jungles and humans alike, and ground fire power that was greater that any in history rather than sending ships and Gatling guns. (CITE HERE) Besides being president, Johnson has big plans for Vietnam. Johnson wanted to go the distance and get the job done. On July 27th 1964, President Johnson escalated …show more content…
involvement in the war by ordering 5,000 military leaders and advisors to go to South Vietnam. This action caused the rise of U.S. forces in Vietnam up to 21,000. The U.S. destroyer USS Maddox was on international waters in the Gulf of Tokin on July 31st, 1964. It was suggested that President Johnson purposely did this to make North Vietnam react so he would have a reason to increase warfare in Vietnam. Ironically, this is exactly how it happened. North Vietnamese torpedo ships attacked the ship, however with the help of a nearby large warship that carries planes, two were just damaged and the rest of the torpedo ships were destroyed. The USS Maddox only had minor surface damage. President Johnson live on both radio and television was broadcasting inaccurate facts on Vietnam.
On August 7th, 1964, President Johnson was given the choice whether or not to raise the U.S. involvement in the war for what happened to the USS Maddox. He knew that sending

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