Why chinese mothers are superior

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Why Chinese Mothers Are Superior
How do you raise your child in the best way? Is it the Western or Chinese methods to prefer? That is the big question in this article. Amy Chua takes her starting point in her own life, where she raises her two daughters, Sophia and Louisa. Their upbringing is influenced by the Chinese methods. Amy Chua never allowed them to attend a sleepover or get any grade less than an A for instance.1
The sender of this article is the 50-year old Chinese woman, Amy Chua, who is a professor at Yale Law School, USA. She argues that the Chinese methods are the most effective way of raising a successful child. According to Amy, there are three main differences between Western and Chinese parenting.
First of all, Western parents are concerned about their children’s’ psyches, while Chinese, roughly said, aren’t. For instance, if a child comes home with a B on the test, some Western parents would still praise their child. The Chinese mother would probably gasp in horror and start an immediate long and hard practice session.
Secondly, Chinese parents believe that their kids owe them everything, while Western parents like Jed (her husband) has the opposite view. The Westerners will most likely say, the children don’t choose their parents and the children don’t owe their parents anything. “Their duty will be to their own kids”.2
Third, Chinese parents know what is best for their children, while Western parents will probably say that the children must figure out themselves what’s best for them.
As you can see, there is a huge cultural barrier between the Chinese and Western parenting.
She uses studies in her article, which increases her credibility like, “In one study of 50 Western American mothers and 48 Chinese immigrant mothers, almost 70 % of the Westerns mothers said either that “stressing academic success is not good for children”….. By contrast, roughly 0 % Chinese mothers felt the same way…”3 Even though she uses a lot of studies to

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