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Who Is Frederick Douglass An Abolitionist

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Who Is Frederick Douglass An Abolitionist
Slavery has always been a difficult topic to discuss from the point of view of a slave, due to the lack of information directly from slaves. Thankfully, a now well-known abolitionist and former slave, Frederick Douglass wrote a narrative of his entire life in slavery, as far back as he could remember. He let the world know the ugly truth of what life was like for an America slave, and what trauma slaves endured all around him. Douglass let’s people explore his innermost thoughts and only hides details when discussing his escape, as to not prevent other slaves from escaping through the Underground Railroad, as he did. His book, Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave, finally humanizes slaves. It also shows many forms …show more content…
No matter the form of rebellion, all abolitionist were striving for the same result, the end of slavery.
Douglass was born into slavery and experienced vastly different masters before fleeing to Freedom in New York. All of his experiences formed him into a strong abolitionist that was able to succeed as a free man, against all odds. His abolitionist views began to take shape when he was still a young boy. His master’s wife began to teach him the alphabet and how to spell a few, simple words until his master saw what was happening. He put a stop to this behavior quickly, “To use his own words, further, he said,”If you give a n* an inch, he will take an ell. A n* should know nothing but to obey his master- to do as he is told to do. Learning would spoil the best n* in the world.”(Douglass 28) This crass and vile language lit a fire in young Douglass, “From that moment, I understood the pathway from slavery to freedom.”(Douglass 29) Douglass used disobedience in the form of learning to read and write. Douglass also used a more aggressive form of resistance after being transported to a plantation to be broken. Douglass began to use violence against his mater, Mr. Covy. After enduring multiple brutal beatings,
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Vesey was born into slavery and able to buy his way out. Sadly, he was unable to buy his family out and committed himself to the abolitionist movement. Vesey was mainly known for his plan to set the town on fire in multiple places as a form of rebellion. Vesey’s plan included setting fires and “…to be ready with axes, knives, and clubs, to kill every man as he came out when the bells began to ring.”(Gorn 136) The pure violence and hatred in Vesey’s plan shows his unnecessary evil and aggressive attitude towards obtaining freedom. While Vesey’s forms of rebellion is drastically different than Douglass’, David Walkers views seemed to be more comparable to those of Douglass. Walker had never experienced slavery first hand, as he was born to a free black woman. Although, Walkers father was still trapped in slavery, helping to form Walkers abolitionist view. Walker was willing to do whatever it took to make progress in the abolitionist movement, but valued peace over violence. Walker was willing to resort to violence but only after peace was found to be inadequate when fighting for the abolishment of slavery. Walker used distribution of knowledge and education as a form of rebellion, telling of the wicked things the whites have done to blacks in slavery, just as Douglass did in his narrative. With this

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