White Collar Crimes
Topics: Federal Bureau of Investigation, Theft, Crime, Criminal justice / Pages: 2 (463 words) / Published: Aug 6th, 2013

The FBI defines white collar crimes as lying, cheating, and stealing. The Department of Justice defines them as non violent illegal activities that involve deception. White collar crimes falls under the purview of Criminal law. They are usually committed for financial gain. They are committed by means of deception used by people who are in an entrepreneurial professional or semi professional position. Not all people that commit white collar crimes are semi or professionals or have special technical knowledge as once thought by the government (Strader, J. K., 2002). White collar crime costs sufficient amount of loss to the federal, state, local government. Private organizations and individuals are effected by white collar crimes as well. People lost their life savings because of white collar crimes. Some examples of these crimes are bankruptcy frauds, government fraud, healthcare fraud, financial fraud, securities fraud, credit card frauds, bribery, antitrust violations, and environmental law violations just to name a few (Cornell Law, 2010). Other crimes that are considered white collar are public corruption, tax evasion, trade secret theft, illegal pharmaceuticals, counterfeiting, and embezzlement (Cornell Law, 2010). The Federal law provides governance over these types of criminal offenses. The state government can prosecute them and they do; however, the federal criminal justice system is more qualified to deal with these types of crimes. When a case where the crimes are multiple or they span to multiple states the federal criminal justice system will handle those cases (HG.org, 2012). “The Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) and other federal agencies employ their far-reaching investigative and prosecutorial services to deal with white collar criminals and their various crimes” (HG.org, 2012). When a company suffers from fraud from any source, the consumers are the ones that suffer. Companies make up the difference by


References: Cornell Law, (2010). White Collar Crime. Retrieved from http://law.cornell.edu/wex/ White-collar crime HG organization, (2012). White Collar Crimes. Retrieved from http://www.hg.org/white-collar-crime,html McGrath, J., (2012). How White Collar Crime Works. Retrieved from http://moeny.howstuffworks.com/white-collar-crime5.htm Strader, J. K., (2002). Understanding White Collar Crimes. Retrieved from http://www.lexisnexis.com/lawschool/stdy/understanding/pdf/WhiteCollarch1.pdf

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