Whirlpool’s Organizational Culture

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Whirlpool’s Organizational Culture
At Whirlpool their Code of Ethics affirms the company’s responsibilities, obligation and duties to serve the world where it does business. The Whirlpool Corporation traditions of ethical behavior begin in 1911, when it was founded and has been passed from generation to generation since that time. The Whirlpool Corporation strives to be known, trusted, and respected as one of the top corporations in the world. The Whirlpool Corporation is committed to the support efforts of helping people and individuals build a better world for themselves and others. By donating time and resources, the Whirlpool Corporation works to help people reach their full potential. By doing so, this also improves the quality of life for these individuals, their neighbors and the communities in which they live. Now, what are Whirlpool’s values? Whirlpool has become one of the most trustworthy, knowledgeable, and resourceful companies in the world. Whirlpool has a set of values that are unvarying and define how their employees are expected to conduct business and behave worldwide. The core values of Whirlpool, Respect, Integrity, Diversity and Inclusion, Teamwork, and the Spirit of Winning, continue to develop innovative solutions and shows it is ever so committed to basic human morality. Respect, employees at Whirlpool are encouraged to share their beliefs, perspectives and opinions. Integrity factors into everything the company does from taking pride what it produces to providing the best possible prices for our customers with honesty. Whirlpool’s core values have made them known, trusted, and respected as one of the world 's top corporate citizens and is a blueprint for other companies to follow. Whirlpool’s culture has contributed to its performance in many ways, but most noticeable is the financial gains. “Since 2001, revenues from products that fit the company 's definition of innovative have risen up from $10 million to $760 million in 2005, or



References: (n.d.). Retrieved from http://www.businessweek.com/stories/2006-05-07/creativity-overflowing "Whirlpool Corporation." - Code of Ethics. N.p., n.d. Web. 17 Aug. 2012. . (n.d.). Retrieved May 10, 2013, from http://www.whirlpoolcorp.com/about/history.aspx

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