What I Admire About the Amish Lifestyle

Good Essays
What I Admire About the Amish Lifestyle
Wiserly Almonte
Professor Schlager When people go to visit an Amish community on Sunday and spend a couple of hours with them, they simply love it. But when it comes to the question, whether they could you live happily in a lifestyle like the Amish, almost everyone would say NO. Because our society is based on material and selfishness concepts, they couldn’t live without all the material stuff. But what they don’t know is how great and awesome it is know that you have an entire community out there to support you whenever you need them, and they are not considered just your neighbors but you family. The Amish live a poor but grateful life with no needs for big material goods, but they are still happier than most. The Amish people speak words of wisdom and are the kindest; I admire how the keep their traditions alive, their simplicity and innocence, their whole way of life. Over the centuries America has changed and the society as well but despite all the time that has passed and the changes the Amish still have the same lifestyle had. They have maintained immutable their beliefs and traditions. Their peaceful mood is a reflection of God in their soul; their world is deeply spiritual; their world is God's world. Their top priority is to serve God, followed by their families. The Amish obey the Ordnung, which is a list or written rules that basically outlines all the aspect of Amish life and the basic of their faith families, and is a perfect way to live.

Self-sacrifice is one of the most important beliefs that characterize the Amish people. Comparing this belief to the material-focused and the "me, myself and I first" that controls our culture, the difference is huge, and yet, if people would think about it- if everybody adopted this value, how different life would be for so many. The materialism and selfishness that rules our world is nothing but a dead-end and loneliness. I hold in respect how

You May Also Find These Documents Helpful

  • Good Essays

    The Ways Of The Amish

    • 355 Words
    • 2 Pages

    The Amish people’s primary mode of substance is emerging agriculture or better known as farming. All of their food is mainly grown, raised, and prepared by the hands of the Amish. Kinship is the backbone of their society. They believe in helping each other out and are very strong in their family ties. Religion is also very important to them and they hold strong values. “The Amish obtain health care from biomedical practitioners, from a variety of complementary and alternative medicine providers, and through the use of home remedies” (In Encyclopedia of Medical Anthropology, 2004, para. 17). The Amish Culture is unique in its emerging agriculture, its kinship, its beliefs and values and its medical philosophy.…

    • 355 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Better Essays

    Amish vs Aussie

    • 1043 Words
    • 5 Pages

    Amish Reject technology and other modern things, they have a system to which they introduce a modern appliance etc. instead of inventing something and letting loss in the community with no thought of repercussions as we do in Australia and many other western societies, they introduce the product and monitor it closely, then they decide whether it is necessary in there society or not, and figure out a way to minimize it to an exceptionable amount which will not interrupt tradition or community relationships. For example: the telephone; in Australia almost every one over the age of 12 has a mobile phone, we carry them around all day and most of us would feel naked with out it. The majority of people would answer the phone in the middle of a conversation or at…

    • 1043 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Satisfactory Essays

    Even with the risk of leaving the Amish culture and being “shunned” the Amish of North America grew by about 12,000 from 2011 to 2012. Statistics show that the numbers increasing from an estimated 261,150 in 2011 to an estimated 273,700 in 20121. In the Amish culture where one was born and raised is usually where they will live as an adult. When counting the population it is not just the adults that are counted it is also the children. The growth of the communities are not just from family sizes increasing but also from converts coming into the Amish culture from the outside English world.…

    • 289 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Satisfactory Essays
  • Better Essays

    I decided to choose the topic about Amish because I’m very curious about the Amish culture. I don’t think people understand how different the Amish live. Students who go to Ohio State University no idea what an Amish person looks like. My cousin takes pictures of horse and buggies to show them what is normal in our town. I live in the country, so therefore there are Amish people all around us. I never understood how they lived, or why they choose lived like that. I know that Amish people are humble people and they don’t ask for much in life. They work hard, have many children, go to church every Sunday, and many other normal things. But what happens when someone wants to leave the Amish community? This…

    • 1292 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Good Essays

    1) Past two weeks I have become more aware of the different cultures that I was never been known that much before in my life. I learn a lot about Amish culture, values and practices, and the understanding Amish cultures is very important for history of Amish. The Amish is branch of Christianity and they originally come from Switzerland. The Amish emerged from Anabaptist movement in 1525, that are known nowadays as Mennonites and later on spread out all over surrounding cities and countries. This old and new Amish does not believe a government involving of religion and values. So that they were marginalized deported from the society, because of their refusal to following the authority the state church in matters of faith. The gender roles are very important in Amish cultures, men are the leader and provider of the family, even though the male and female share some of the family responsibilities. The Amish lifestyle is totally different from the tradition American lifestyles, Amish community have believed some guidelines that are called Ordnung which are adult baptism; separation of church and state. Couple areas of perinatal care that I want to discuss with Mary are the hospitalization of their and how it will…

    • 653 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Witness: Amish World

    • 858 Words
    • 4 Pages

    The thriller film ‘Witness’, directed by Peter Weir in 1985, tells about cultural conflicts between the Amish of Western Pennsylvania and Modern American corruption and violence. Philadelphia Police officer, John Book was obligated to hide from the three brutally and corrupt police officers as they were looking for a little Amish boy, Samuel Lapp. The boy witnessed the brutal killings and identified the killer as the three police officers. The ‘Witness’ strongly displayed many images of people and incorporated several techniques and images in various scenes to portray the contrast between two different worlds.…

    • 858 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Better Essays

    Amish People Essay Example

    • 2444 Words
    • 10 Pages

    The Amish are a very remarkable minority in that their culture is very peculiar, especially to the people of the mainstream culture. One incident, which acts as a very good example of the previously mentioned point, occurred a couple years ago: fifty-two Americans decided to visit the Holmes County and hired an Amishman to answer some of their questions about the Amish culture. The first question, of course, was, "What does it mean to be Amish?" The Amish man, Monroe L. Beachy, did not really have an explanation as to what it really means to be Amish, so he decided to ask a question of his own. "How many of you have TV in your homes?" Fifty-two hands went up. "Now, how many of you feel that perhaps you would be better off without TV in your homes?" Again, fifty-two hands went up. "All right. Now, how many of you are going to go home and get rid of your TV?" Not one hand went up! As a conclusion, and an overall answer to the question, he stated: "As a church, if we see or experience something that is not good for us spiritually, we will discipline ourselves to do without. The world in general does not know what it is to do without" (Beachy). The Amish people try to preserve the lifestyle and traditions of late 17th century Christianity.…

    • 2444 Words
    • 10 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Good Essays

    Amish Folk Culture

    • 743 Words
    • 3 Pages

    Amish came from Europe as Mennonites and believe in strict policies that had to do with not being "... conformed to this world." Their clothing, means of transportation and diet are easily seen to not be conforming to the world. While other people around the Amish are wearing Gap clothing, driving cars and eating Kit-Katz, the Amish are wearing handmade clothing, horses, and eating fresh meat and crop. All Amish take church and religion very seriously and some are said to have long services were they sing in unison and where a single hymn may take more than thirty minutes. The role of the church dominates their life style and their social…

    • 743 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    The Amish live a very different lifestyle than most people today. Amish reject technology in favor of a simpler lifestyle. The Amish are a group of people who follow the teachings of Jacob Ammann, a 17th-century citizen of Switzerland. Most of the Amish live in the United States. They follow simple customs and refuse to take oaths, vote, or perform military service. They shun modern technology and conveniences. Transportation for the Amish is by horse and buggy. They do not have electricity or telephones in their homes. The men usually carry beards and pants with buttons instead of zippers. The women wear white head coverings and plain dresses, usually without buttons. The Amish don’t go to a regular church but instead they invite people to their homes where the practice their religion in peace and grace. Amish beliefs play a major role in their desire to live separate from society. Some people may think that the Amish force their belief on their children and teenagers but they do have quite the freedom. When they turn sixteen, boys and girls are allowed to live free of the strict Amish codes of conduct until they decide whether or not they want to be baptized and join the Amish church. This period of time is called rumspringa which literally means ‘‘running around.’’ While the teenagers are testing the boundaries of their new freedom they have to decide whether they want to come back to the Amish living or not.…

    • 450 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Living Diversities

    • 538 Words
    • 3 Pages

    First of all, living structures are important to both Amish and Mormons, yet the social life of the Amish are very different from Mormons. Nowadays, the Amish live mostly in Pennsylvania, Ohio, Indiana, and even as far as Ontario Canada; however, Mormons live almost everywhere in the world. Unlike Mormons’ modern life, the Amish enjoy simple living, and wearing plain clothes as they believe that they are not allowed to pollute and damage God’s creations. The Amish tend to resist using modern technology for the same reasons. On the other hand, Mormons welcome new technologies as most of us today, they believe that new technologies can provide easier living and help better protect God’s creations.…

    • 538 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Satisfactory Essays

    Sociology Amish society

    • 378 Words
    • 2 Pages

    Amish society is very different from American society. Both societies have different beliefs and value very different things. The Amish reject modern advances, while the rest of America is constantly striving for the latest technology. The Amish believe in humility and religion above most everything else in life. They have very simple lives and believe in surviving with just the necessities. They are very community and family oriented. Americans put more value on money, material possessions, becoming “successful,” and having fun. Most Americans are independent and fend for themselves, while the Amish work together as a community and are very close.…

    • 378 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Satisfactory Essays
  • Better Essays

    To begin understanding the Amish style of assimilation we must first try to understand the Amish and their traditional beliefs and culture they brought to the United States during their immigration. Starting in the early 18th century, many of the Amish migrated to the U.S. Most of the members who remained in Europe rejoined the Mennonites. Few Amish congregations existed by 1900. On 1937-JAN-17, the last Amish congregation -- in Ixheim, Germany -- merged with their local Mennonite group and became the Zweibrücken Mennonite Church. The Amish no longer existed in Europe as an organized group (Robinson, 2004). The most distinctive belief of the Amish is reflected in the Bible verse "Be ye not conformed to the world," meaning that one should separate oneself in one 's appearance and practices from the mainstream of society, conforming instead as well as possible to Biblical tradition.…

    • 951 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Good Essays

    literacy skills, and it starts with having a greater connection with your family. Basic learning skills must start at a very young age when the child's brain is most capable retaining information. The father of the household will start by reading a children s Disney story to his six year old son. Though the boy is not able at this young age to read or write, he is actively participating and gaining an understanding of words that are read to him by his father. This boy in Amish society is considered to be a fully literate family member.…

    • 393 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Better Essays

    References: Donnermeyer, J. F., & Friedrich, L. (2002). Amish society : An overview reconsidered. Journal of Multicultural Nursing & Health, 8(3), 14. Retrieved from http://search.proquest.com/docview/220297959?accountid=32521…

    • 1754 Words
    • 8 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Powerful Essays

    A folk culture is a small, self-reliant community that is technologically simple and traditional in nature. The term "folk culture" also refers to the artifacts of this community 's material culture (such as tools, clothing, and houses) as well as the nonmaterial culture (traditions and institutions). This essay describes how one folk culture -- the Old Order Amish -- has successfully resisted acculturation and assimilation into the dominant mainstream culture of North America for more than two centuries.…

    • 1395 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Powerful Essays

Related Topics