What Was the Impact of the 14th Century Black Plaque on Europe

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What was the impact of the 14th century black plaque on Europe?

The Black Plague spread from Asia into Europe in the mid fourteenth century and killed thousands along its path of destruction. Trade, war, and other contacts between Europe and Asia caused the diseases to spread. The plague impacted Europe in more ways than just killing about a third of the population. The plague impacted Europe's social fabric in that it tore people apart in the fight to survive. The church lost the trust of many and Europe's economy also suffered greatly during the plague. These factors sum up a Europe that was devastated by more than death.
Through the years Europe built up a relation with the Far East. Through this relation goods were carried from one culture to the other. Although this relationship may have seemed beneficial, it brought devastating affects on Europe. Although difficult to reliably tracing the exact start of the plague to an exact source, The disease was carried by fleas on black rats. Rats carried flees to spread the Black plague across Europe. For example, an infected flea infects a human whom another flea bites and becomes infected, and so on. Once the mutated plague became airborne, the plague spread even more rapidly.
The plague hurt Europe's society considerably. As people died by the thousands, fear of the Plague drove many to abandon their family. Children were often left to their own devices, as their parents feared giving them the Plague or getting it from them. Family values and society broke down as neighbor turned against neighbor and brother against brother in order to save his own life. For most it was every man for himself.
Many people, desperate for answers, turned to the Church. The Church told the people of Europe that it was God's will to have the Plague. Many thought it unjust of God and turned away from the Church. Even priests, bishops and other church officials, were driven by fear to hide from the dreaded Plague. The Catholic

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