What Motivates You?

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What Motivates You?

Everyday we pursue things. We move from one place to another; one goal from another. This is to satisfy our needs, wants, things that could pleasure and please us. So, what drives us? What motivates us to do such things? The answer is simple: the need to be satisfied and superior.

As what was stated in the hierarchy of needs, one must satisfy the lower level needs before climbing one step higher in the hierarchy. This is rational because as one is contented with his or her physiological needs, the need to climb higher, to find safety and security, becomes a main attraction, as well as the need to belong and to be loved, and so on and so forth. This is also supported by the superiority principle that every man, feels inferior, and thus, wishes to be superior. This does not necessarily mean power over man, but rather the need to be superior over oneself. And with this in mind, we are enticed to do better in life. For example, when you already have all the basic needs like food, clothing, shelter, water, etc. there is this tendency to look for more, to strive better, because for life to go on, we need to keep on moving forward. So one does better in his or her job to get recognition and probably a promotion, and with that a bigger salary. With a bigger salary, he or she now can buy on instalment a house and lot in a subdivision where there is better security. And also, status is established. Once the feeling of superiority is recognized, the need to maintain or exceed the status quo kicks in. Another consideration for the actions we brought upon our lives lie in our psychological context. As what was explained by Sigmund Freud, personality comes in different forms. A person is a pleasure-seeking individual, and the need to satisfy one’s self drives that person to do anything to fulfil that need. However, in reality there are limitations that are bound to meet that satisfaction, so we learn to prioritize the things that we want or need

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