What Is Malcolm X: An Alternative To The Civil Rights Movement?

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“I have a dream that my four little children will one day live in a nation where they will not be judged by the color of their skin, but by the content of their character” (Martin Luther King, Jr.). Throughout the history of the United States, African Americans faced countless racial segregations and discriminations from the people and from the government. After the 1950’s, African Americans thirsted in ending these racial segregations through fighting back for their civil rights with the help of African American civil rights leaders.
During the Second World War, African Americans participated in the battlefield and didn’t face any discriminations from their fellow brothers in arms. In 1964, President Truman called for an end to discrimination, however, this call resulted in miscorrelation and resulted in school desegregations. Furthermore, public schools were discriminating African Americans, especially in the South. Back in1954, the state laws by the United States
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Martin Luther King Jr.'s vision of a racially integrated society achieved by peaceful means. During this time, African Americans achieved control in the African American community declaring it as Black Power. Although this power was mostly outspread in the north, north blacks were still confined to public high schools and homes. In addition, the group known as the Nation of Islam emerged with Malcom X as their leader. He claimed that African Americans were in war with the whites. Following his religion in Islam, Malcom X performed a pilgrimage in Maca. On his return, he was assassinated by the black Muslims group due to his change on violence. Three years after Malcom X’s death, on April 4, 1968, Martin Luther King, Jr. was also assassinated in which case, this erupted 125 cities to race riots. Furthermore, these riots were a symbol of racial

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