What Are The Stereotypes In To Kill A Mockingbird

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To Kill a Mockingbird, the American classic which throughout the whole text exposed the several stereotypes that existed in our nation decades ago. To Kill a Mockingbird showed in depth stereotypes in the 1930s not only in fictional Maycomb, Alabama but throughout our whole nation at the time. The book emphasized on racial, class, gender, and even social stereotypes and how in many cases they were unfair and ridiculous in modern day opinion which is why it is a stunning piece of literature and was even turned into an Academy Award winning film. Probably the most portrayed stereotype was gender roles. All throughout the book we encounter Scout learning about life and what Maycomb thinks is appropriate for men and women. Anything abnormal or …show more content…
What today seems dreadful, back in the day seemed normal and fine. To Kill a Mockingbird shows the daily norms and society rules in the 1930s and even before. It also shows Scout’s contrary opinion and her unfortunate realizing of things in life. Men and women's routines were perfectly fine with most people. Back then women didn’t have many rights and men had heavy roles. There were injustices for both sides, but unfortunately women were way more discriminated. Maycomb everyday life don't just represent a town from Alabama but an overall similarity to most American towns and even most of the world. Scout, Dill, Jem, Atticus, Aunt Alexandra and the rest of Maycomb were victims of past poor decisions, male brutal dominance, and society opinion. Women not having equal jobs or pay, not being to be on jury on hold many other positions, and almost forced to have certain behavior was totally unfair, but that was fine and perfect back then. The readers of the book need to understand that the characters followed what was taught to be right and how life has changed drastically. Scout was one of the few characters in the book to try to stand up to this injustice and look for

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