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What Are The Essential Elements Of A Mental Health Court?

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What Are The Essential Elements Of A Mental Health Court?
Serving Mentally Ill Prison Populations xxxxxx XXXX University

Serving Mentally Ill Prison Populations

In a publication “The Essential Elements of a Mental Health Court (2007)” explains that how mental health courts are a recent and rapidly expanding phenomenon. This interpretation discusses in the late 1990s only a few courts were accepting cases of this nature. Since then numerous mental health courts have been established to examine defendant’s cases that suffer with a mental illnesses. According to the publication “The Essential Elements of a Mental Health Court (2007)” these courts emphasized their differences and their diversity is undeniable; the similarities across mental health courts share common characteristics.

A specialized court docket, which employs a problem-solving approach to court processing in lieu of more traditional court procedures for certain defendants with mental illnesses.

Judicially supervised, community-based treatment plans for each defendant participating in the court, which a team of court staff and mental health
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If the policymakers and practitioners are to be able to design the most effective courts, empirical evidence about which aspects of mental health courts have an impacted effects, why, and for whom. Gathering evidence supporting answers for these questions will help strengthen a more impacting mental health court module by identifying the appropriate target populations and revealing the key practices. Further research will identify the elements of mental health courts that traditional courts could implement that possibly will have a greater outcome for the offenders that suffer with mental health illnesses throughout the criminal justice system (Mental Health Courts

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