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What Are The Causes Of Major Revolutions

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What Are The Causes Of Major Revolutions
4. The Causes of Major Revolutions: Latin American Revolutions:
1. People from all classes are discontented.
Mexico had political and economic stability, but at expense of farmers and laborers (only select few had wealth).
2. People feel restless and held down by unacceptable restrictions in society, religion, the economy, or government.
Since 1876, President Porfirio Díaz/the dictatorship severely restricted the prospects of Mexico’s middle classes for political and economic advancement.
3. People are hopeful about the future but are being forced to accept less than they expected.
The Díaz dictatorship saw the biggest and most rapid period of economic expansion and change in Mexican history, but not without consequences: it led to mass
…show more content…
Social classes closest to one another are the most hostile.
The government system also prevented landowners and ranchers that were doing okay, from growing, or even surviving in some cases, when they faced the rich.
6. Scholars and thinkers give up on the way their society operates.
One revolutionary leader later said, “I began to feel the need for change in our social organization when I was 19, when, back in my town.… I saw the police commissioner get drunk almost every day in the town pool hall, in the company of his secretary; with the local judge who was also the … tax collector; with the head of the post office; and with some merchant or army officer, persons all of whom constituted the influential class of that small world.” If you crossed these people, they could ruin your life, and your family’s.
7. The government does not respond to the needs of its society.
The centralized and corrupt political system became extremely inflexible. It was not able to do away with the abuses that characterized it, especially because these abuses seemed to keep society in favor of the rich and powerful.
8. Government leaders and the ruling class begin to doubt themselves, and some join with opposition

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