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Wall-E Analysis

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Wall-E Analysis
Humanity has been searching for an answer in the lifeless objects that humans call their own creations with the intent to embody the technological genesis of a world that will soon consume the future of time. When comparing Joseph Kosinski’s post-apocalyptic, Oblivion, and Jim Morris’ animated film, Wall-E, similarities between both struggling protagonists are revealed, leading the reader to realize that the human instinct of survival has evolved into an impulse for humans to forge a world of their own, though when humans periodically forget to reflect upon human nature, their unconscious minds become ignorant of the encompassing world. Through the use of akin settings, characterization, and plot parallels, the directors of these two analogous …show more content…
That difference being, Jack is a human attempting to fill the mold of a robot, and Wall-E embodies a robot, though he is human at heart. Besides that, Wall-E and Jack essentially serve coequal purposes in the identical plot lines of each film. Jack and Wall-E are both occupied with an original mission and share identical patterns of characterization, though it is on this mission that the directors allow each character to experience the tenacity of love and realize the relevance of human connection needed to obtain a greater existence. By drawing similarities between a personified robot and a human, one is able to conclude that as humans become more immersed in technology, humanity begins to fade away, promoting the reversal of human roles and the duties of robots. For instance, in both films, people preferred communication through the use of screens and gadgets instead of personal interaction with one another. As the evolution of technology continues with time, humans will fail to realize that the wires of those very electronics are only constricting their mentality, while the screen of their gadgets compasses a narrow one-way perspective of the surrounding world. When one looks at a screen, the human eye can see nothing beyond the barrier of the black glass, and likewise, the brain cannot identify a …show more content…
Humans are evolving into the composition of their creations while diminishing the content of humanity itself in the process. Human connection to each other, not to technology, is the only way humans could prevent themselves from getting lost in the dazed darkness of wanting to live a life only to breathe instead of being found with the burning desire to live a life to prevail. Therefore, by comprehending the underlying message of Kosinski and Morris’ work, one may become aware of the machinery that is woven into the DNA of humanity, but now it is ultimately an individual’s choice to become

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