Voltaire's Candide

Good Essays
Ali Haydu
Candide Analysis Francois-Marie Arouet, better known as Voltaire, was destined to have a long and prosperous literary career. His influence was so great during the eighteenth century, that some historians call it the century of Voltaire. His usage of irony, satire, theme, and allegory has shaped the literary world, and many historians have studied the style of Voltaire’s writing. Voltaire was one of the most well-known Philosophes and author of the eighteenth century. His works, like Candide, have influenced toleration, justice, politics and equality in modern times.
“On the twenty-first day of November, 1694, in the city of Paris, a fifth child was born to M. Francois Arouet. The child was named Francois-Marie” (Redman 1). Francois-Marie had a pen-name when he wrote books; it was Voltaire. Voltaire had a variety of jobs in the literary field (Redman 572). “During his own age, he was noted as a political satirist, playwright, and poet. Voltaire has been remembered most for his incisive short stories, which convey complex philosophical ideas” (Sturm). He was truly a jack of all trades, in the literary world. He received very little formal education before the age of nine. When he was older he was sent to the Jesuit College of Louis-le-Grand, where he received a formal education (Gaasch). The college was operated by Jesuits, or Roman Catholic Priests (Cummings). “Voltaire depicts religious men as hypocrites who don’t live up to the religion they profess to believe” (Candide: Theme Analysis). “Voltaire makes the church out to be one of the most corrupt, violence-ridden institutions on the planet” (Candide: Theme Analysis). The symbol of the church is referred to throughout Voltaire’s writing. However, Voltaire never gave credit to anyone for being his “inspiration” for writing. Voltaire crusaded against corruption, censorship and religious intolerance all his life. These, among other things, may be interpreted as inspirations (Redman 58). In 1726,

You May Also Find These Documents Helpful

  • Satisfactory Essays

    1. In the very first chapter Candide is literally kicked out of the “most beautiful and delightful of possible castles,” expelled from an “earthly paradise.” At the end of the novel, he says “we must cultivate our garden.” What is Voltaire suggesting by framing his story in this way and by echoing the Biblical story of the Fall? 2. Why does Candide select Martin to be his travel companion? How do Martin’s views differ from Pangloss'? Offer specific details in the two philosophers’ outlooks—yes…

    • 426 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Satisfactory Essays
  • Good Essays

    Voltaire – Candide In Voltaire’s Candide, he makes his views on society very clear and obvious. Using satire, Voltaire pokes fun—for the lack of a better word—at the views and philosophies of his time. Voltaire uses different characters to represent different ideologies and their reactions to events in the story to represent ways in which their ideologies fail to effectively solve problems; as a satirical strategy, Voltaire exaggerates different parties’ reactions and encourages the reader to laugh…

    • 1088 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    As I know from reading Candide, some of the members of Candide’s group and Candide, decide to go to a garden and make it their own. They decide it would be best for all of them if they worked on it every day to occupy their time because they were very bored with nothing to do all day long. appalling because Candide and the other members just went through very terrible things in their last adventures and have seen the pain and misery of the world but still choose to work in their garden. In this essay…

    • 907 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    On the surface, Voltaire’s Candide seems to be about every stupidity, every transgression, and every immoral act conceivable to man. It is a satirical and absurd look at life and religion. It makes a mockery of organized religious institutions and leaders. The hypocrisy of the actions of these leaders makes the reader wonder if Voltaire is against every religious order and even God, or is it simply the hypocrisy he abhors. In examining this book, it is a satirical way of looking at the hypocrisy…

    • 1196 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    and ideas in '"Candide." Most noticeably, he attacks religious intolerance, greed, and the denial of love. In the beginning of the novel, after Candide is kicked from his castle, he flees from between attacking armies to where he meets an orator. The man had been giving a speech on charity, and addresses Candide as "my friend." Once he finds that Candide does not 'believe the Pope to be antichrist,' however, his attitude changes. He soon forgets his teachings and insults Candide as a "wretch" and…

    • 824 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    outlook on the world than one another. During Voltaire’s lifetime, an ideological revolution was taking place. During this period new ideas and beliefs about the universe came to be. These ideas were then argued and pondered by the intellectuals of society. Voltaire was one of the largest contributors to this ideological revolution, a shift in paradigm which would later come to be known as…

    • 1214 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Throughout Candide, the main theme concentrated on optimism. However, did not possess the same definition we practice today. Optimism, during Voltaire’s era, was derived from Leibniz philosophy interpreted as, “the best of all possible worlds.” (Candide, p. xiv) Since God was perfect He must have created a perfect world. On the other hand, redemption centers on the attempt to put right what once went wrong. All through, Candide, Pangloss lived by and mentored Candide according to the optimism…

    • 210 Words
    • 1 Page
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    well as my own. As opposed to the interactive oral two weeks ago, Friday’s discussion highly emphasized the contextual considerations versus cultural. One main emphasis of the discussion, contextually, was the purpose of the main characters within Candide. Voltaire makes use of several archetypes within the novel, such as the hero’s journey, the wise elder(s), and the sidekick. Two of the wise elders, Martin and Pangloss,…

    • 327 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Powerful Essays

    Voltaire’s Candide

    • 1940 Words
    • 8 Pages

    The Human Tissue Act 65 of 1983 regulates all aspects regarding organ transplants. This Act was last amended in 1989. Since then medical science has developed so big in size and to such an extent that organ transplants today are almost routine operations in many hospitals. Unfortunately the current methods of procuring human organs are not supplying the demand. A new approach, the commercialization of human organs for transplantation is a possibility with the potential to supply one hundred…

    • 1940 Words
    • 8 Pages
    Powerful Essays
  • Good Essays

    Candide is a challenging book to read and analyze because the novel does not follow the writing style of a novel today. Despite this, the interactive oral was successful. My understanding of contextual and cultural considerations, including how and why certain characters partake in particular activities, expanded through the discussion. The discussion centered on who Candide, the main character, is. We concluded that Candide represents naivety. Developing Candide’s innocence and sheltering it,…

    • 325 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Good Essays