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Vladek's Quirks and Habits

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Vladek's Quirks and Habits
Valerie Alvarado
Instructor: Darci Cather
English 1302-SP2
5-12-14
Vladek’s Reaction to the Holocaust The Holocaust was a traumatizing and depressing time period in history due to the Nazis in the leadership of their dictator Adolf Hitler. The Nazis were a Political Party during World War ΙΙ from 1941 through 1945. Many Jews during this time were discriminated, murdered, and humiliated in front of many other Jews and Germans. “Six million Jews died in a merciless way at the hands of the Nazis” (Sherbok 1). The Holocaust is an unforgettable period in history that left a scar on many Jews including Vladek. Vladek was a Jew and a survivor of the Holocaust that experienced and witnessed several tragedies during this time. The war was over when his son Art Spiegelman is willing to write a book about the Holocaust. He asked his father Vladek if he could help him write his book by telling him his story and experiences during this time, Vladek agrees. Due to the Holocaust and unforgettable experiences Vladek went through, his life was never the same, he changed a lot in the manner of being more careful with money and resourceful with the things he had. Vladek also became very strict with his son Art Spiegelman and had a very strong character this is reasonable because as a young man he went through a crisis by going to the war at a young age, lost his wife and first son. The Holocaust definitely changed his style of living and his personality that led to a lot of consequences. One of the things that Vladek had was that he never wanted to throw food away because during the Holocaust Vladek and his wife’s family were very limited on food hence the reason he was very resourceful with it. When Art was small, he will make him eat all his food on his plate and if he would deny eating his food his father will refrigerate the left overs and made Art eat them the following day until there was no more food left. “Sometimes he’d even save it to serve again and again



Cited: Works cited Cohn-Sherbok, Dan. "The Challenge Of The Holocaust." International Journal Of Public Theology 7.2 (2013): 197-209. Academic Search Complete. Web. 12 May 2014. Brenneis, Sara J. "Carlos Rodríguez Del Risco And The First Spanish Testimony From The Holocaust." History & Memory 25.1 (2013): 51-76. Humanities Full Text (H.W. Wilson). Web. 12 May 2014. Spiegelman, Art. Maus Ι My Father Bleeds History. New York: Pantheon Books, 1992. Print. Spiegelman, Art. Maus ΙΙ And Here My Troubles Began. New York: Pantheon Books, 1992. Print.

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