Virtue: Comparing the Views of Confucius and Aristotle

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Virtue Title Page

Virtue: Comparing the Views of Confucius and Aristotle:

Bernadette C. Townsend
Humanities 101, {019016} Fall 2005 – Mini Session

Strayer University

Instructor: Professor David Allen

Outline

Virtue: Comparing the Views of Confucius and Aristotle;

Confucius Social Philosophy

This paper will explore and discuss the social and political philosophy of Confucius and Aristotle, the views on virtue. The paper will examine the craft and artistic accomplishments these two philosophers mastered. Furthermore, the paper will explore and compare the two views.

Achievements and Accomplishments:

What types of achievements did Confucius and Aristotle do?

Teachings by Confucius and Aristotle

Conclusion:
The achievements and accomplishments of Confucius and Aristotle were similar in the way that both were in the same era, yet different because the views for the most part focused on different areas in humanity. Both of these men endured similar poverty-stricken lives as young men. Both men became heroes and left legacies to large groups of followers.

VI. References

Thesis:

The practice and beliefs Confucius and Aristotle suggested have shaped our country and the manner in

which we behave towards one another. Possessing virtue or a sort of charisma comes from being a

good person and treating others good.

The views on similar issues will be discussed and compared. The paper will examine the people that

each of these men influenced and the time period in which they influenced.

Furthermore, the paper will explore the influence the two men have on our government and society

today.

Confucius' teachings were based on parameters established by Heaven. He believed that

men are responsible for their actions and should be held accountable for them.

Confucius's social philosophy revolves around compassion and loving others. The Golden

Rule, "Do unto

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