Violence: The Role Of Violence In The Civil Rights Movement

Good Essays
What if Great Britain did not declare war on colonists, would it have pushed them even harder to fight, peacefully that is or use violence for their right to become a self-governing nation? Without violence conducted on by peace, would any movements be ignited? In some cases yes, violence is acceptable for social change. More things have changed throughout history by violence then peaceful protest has ever done. Also, peace will eventually turn to violence. Violence will be viewed as acceptable to some and evil to others.
James Lawson, a Civil Rights activist, believed that "the violence was accepted" by African-Americans in the South. Furthermore, Lawson argued that violence was not the only means of a solution within the civil rights movement. Additionally, he stated that non-violence played a role, too, even if it has been excessively promoted within the popular narrative today as the only thing that contributed to the fall of widespread white supremacy in the United States. While nonviolent rebels, such as one of the most famous not long ago, Martin Luther King Jr
…show more content…
For example, The American Revolution (1775-1783) which is also known as the United States War of Independence. Attempts by the British government to hike revenue by taxing the colonies met with heated protest among many colonists, who disliked their lack of image in Parliament and demanded the equal rights as other British citizens. The colonial opposition led to violence in 1770, when British soldiers opened fire on a crowd of colonists, killing five men in what is remembered as the Boston Massacre. While nonviolence set the building blocks upon which progress was to be built, violence is what allowed for the building of growth to happen. Ultimately, both of these approaches were necessary and made off of each other to achieve political, economic and or social

You May Also Find These Documents Helpful

  • Good Essays

    Americans in the Civil Rights movement during the 1950s to 1960s because of frustration caused by the time consuming and ineffectiveness of peaceful non-violence. After the initial hype of non-violence during the 1955 Montgomery Bus Boycotts, non-violence eventually lost its influence as it was not yielding the results the African-Americans had hoped for. In addition to this, non-violence was met with police brutality and violence, making it dangerous to be involved in Civil Rights Movements and discouraging…

    • 718 Words
    • 21 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    The Civil Rights Movement was a huge part of America’s history. Many people fought for their rights through peaceful protest and nonviolent marches. Nonviolence is the avoidance of violence, this played a big role in MLK’s protest. Most of these acts were inspired by MLK and his philosophy. But there were other ways of protest that weren’t as peaceful as MLK’s. Most of these included violent acts. They had their own philosophy of violence. However, there are multiple reasons why Dr. Martin Luther…

    • 108 Words
    • 1 Page
    Good Essays
  • Better Essays

    Non-Violence During the Civil Rights Movement Mahatma Gandhi was a wise man and taught multiple lessons to his people about the workings of nonviolence. He called it Satyagraha which translates to “Soul-force” or “Love-force”. Gandhi is renowned not only as the “Father of India” but also as the originator of the modern nonviolence or passive movement (444). During his lifetime (1869-1948) he performed countless acts of nonviolence to help end the struggle for Indian independence from Britain which…

    • 1128 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Satisfactory Essays

    Imagine after a hard day at work you had to give up your seat to someone who is more “important” than you all because you are African-American. Discrimination, segregation, and violent. Which that led to the Civil Rights Movement. Discrimination is the unjust or prejudicial treatment of different categories of people or things especially on the grounds of race,age, and gender. For example of discrimination there were the Jim Crow laws. The name Jim Crow laws first came around…

    • 179 Words
    • 1 Page
    Satisfactory Essays
  • Satisfactory Essays

    The Civil Right Movement is working but not fast enough. There is a lot of violence as a result of the change that is trying to be made. African Americans try to use a non-violent approach but whites just turn it around and make it violent. Its not working fast enough to help anyone. First they tried to use a bus boycott to try and gain themselves more respect and rights. This didn’t work as well as they hoped because blacks didn’t really come out with everything they wanted. The boycott ended up…

    • 291 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Satisfactory Essays
  • Powerful Essays

    Civil Rights Movements in Alabama Segregation was a way of life in the South at the beginning of the Twentieth Century. Many people treated others terribly because the color of their skin and went on without it even fazing them, they all went on thinking it was okay, when it was not morally right. African Americans were treated horribly, almost as if they were not human. It was impossible to find any aspect of life unsegregated in the south. The Schools, restaurants, and even bathrooms were all…

    • 1846 Words
    • 8 Pages
    Powerful Essays
  • Powerful Essays

    Civil Rights Civil rights throughout history played an intricate role in many if not all aspects of society. Economically, socially, and politically the civil rights movement has impacted today’s society. Certain events are considered landmark events in the civil rights movement because they changed the course of the civil rights movement as well as the course of history. The Supreme Court case Brown vs The Board of Education, and Malcom X’s Ballot or Bullet speech played key roles in the success…

    • 2831 Words
    • 12 Pages
    Powerful Essays
  • Good Essays

    Nonviolence has two closely related meanings. It can refer, first, to a general philosophy of abstention from violence because of moral or religious principle and second, it can refer to the behavior of people using nonviolent action. Ethics plays a large role in the nonviolence movement, many people believe in using nonviolence as their only form of resolution because using violence would simply be the wrong solution. The goal of this type of nonviolence is not to defeat the enemy, but to win…

    • 1122 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    The Civil Right Movement was successful because it ended segregation. First, Ruby was born in Tylertown,Mississippi on September 8th 1954. “Ruby Bridges” was the first African American girl being escorted by United States to attend an all American white school. Tulane University Presented Bridges with honorary degree in 2012. Ruby was born to sharecroppers Aborn and Lucille Bridges.Ruby parents decided to move the family to New Orleans in 1958 when Ruby was 4 years old. Next, “Martin Luther…

    • 332 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Specifically, developments to get rights for the Americans particularly the blacks I.e. Minorities have had exceptional verifiable criticalness. It secured citizenship for the blacks and different minorities additionally have re-imagined winning origination of the way of social equality and part of government in ensuring these rights. Such sacred changes nullified subjugation and set up the citizenship status of blacks.The initial phase of the black protest activity in the post-Brown period began…

    • 518 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays