Vintage Ad Analysis Essay

Good Essays
Topics: World War II
Vintage Ad Analysis
Angel Lopez
DeVry University

Vintage Ad Analysis During World War II Japan and Germany were the main enemies toward the United States, Japan was the one who bombed Pearl Harbor, which brought the US into the war. Germany was the one slaughtering innocent people, mainly Jewish and Polish, Germany was being ruled by Adolf Hitler one of the most hated and evil rulers in history. The advertisement itself is very visual and appealing. This ad and many others were very affective during this time because they all had the ability of showing ethos, pathos, and logos.
The first thing the advertisement portrays is ethos which is the credibility or ethical appeal of an ad. First off the picture is showing Adolf Hitler with a pistol hovering over the world, and when look at him I think of all the horrible stuff he’s done. For example Hitler, with the help of Soviet Russia started WWII with the invasion of Poland. Also after the war began Hitler began the Holocaust which involved over 11
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The American society was very productive during WWII, helping make ammunition and guns for the soldiers etc. The phrase in the ad “Our homes are in danger!” means that the two leaders in the ad are trying to attack. Also the ad shows the world but the US is shown more than the any other country which suggests that the place that is trying to be attacked is The United States. The main point of this ad is in the phrase “Our Job, Keep ‘em Firing” is asking for the American people too help out with the war by making ammunition and guns for planes, tanks, soldiers et cetera. The phrase and also the picture help the audience realize that in order to prevent any danger coming to US is by helping out with the war. The ad used the act of reasoning which was the prevention of danger coming to the US to persuade the audience to help out with defeating their

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