Viktor Frankl: Logotherapy and Meaning of Life

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1. According to Frankl how did people find meaning in their lives in the midst of the concentration camp?
The meaning that the people in the concentration camp found was that they had to erase their expectations of what they had for life, and replace it with what their expectations were from themselves and others.

2. What did you find most revolting about life in the concentration camp? The most revolting part of a concentration camp is the sheer evil that it takes place. It’s sickening to think of the horrible things these people went through, and what many had to do to survive. It’s even more sad that the majority of people affected were innocent human beings. It’s humbling to hear about especially when comparing it to what we think is a “bad day”.
3. Give three concrete examples of people in the camp and how they found meaning amidst the adversity.
Love, work, and overcoming adversities are three examples of how people found meaning amidst the elements. If one couldn’t find motivation to get throughout for themselves, they let the love for another or each other motivate them. They found meaning in their work that it served some sort of purpose so that they’d have a reason for doing it. The last element they found meaning with was the hunger to overcome bad times, and the fight they had to want to win out over their captors.

4. What was the role of apathy for the prisoners?
Apathy comes to the forefront when prisoners get used to what it’s like to life within the camp. At this point they are finding their motivation from staying alive, and helping their companions survive.

5. What did Frankl say about freedom in the concentration camp? “Freedom is only part of the story and half of the truth. Freedom is but the negative aspect of the whole phenomenon whose positive aspect is responsibleness.”
6. How could Frankl say that there was a sort of freedom in the concentration camp when all their freedom was taken away? Isn’t this

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