Vietnamese Americans

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Abstract
The following paper will discuss Vietnamese Americans and their journey to America. I will talk about how these incredible and resilient people fought to succeed it a world that seemed to hold the odds against them. The culture, beliefs, and challenges of Vietnamese people are a precise paradigm of their strength and perseverance.

Unfortunately, Vietnamese Americans make up only a small percent of the total American Population today. There are many stereotypes associated with the Vietnamese, but the truth is, we really know very little about their culture. After the Viet Nam War, many Vietnamese citizens immigrated to the United States to escape political Prosecution and poverty. Faced with a variety of obstacles and challenges, true to Vietnamese culture, Vietnamese Americans persevered and soared above any tribulations they were faced with. Today, children are integrating smoothly within the United States public school system while still holding on strongly to their native culture.

Prior Knowledge of Vietnamese Americans Prior to my research, I did not know much about the Vietnamese people or their culture. I learned about the Viet Nam War, and about how many innocent people were persecuted. I was familiar with the stereotype that all Asian children excel in school and are great musicians. I have experienced that many of the local nail salons here in Florida are owned and operated by Vietnamese people. I have also heard that Vietnamese gangs are of the most violent. I have not been in contact with many Vietnamese people in my life, but I am looking forward to learning more about them.

Narrative Analysis
The Vietnam War ended in 1975. It was then, subsequent of the Fall of Saigon, when the first wave of Vietnamese Immigrants traveled to the United States. Fearful for their safety in their own country, many Vietnamese natives were apprehensive that members of the communist party would retaliate against them for working with



Bibliography: Tuan, M. (1998). Forever Foreigners or Honorary Whites, the Asian Experience Today. New Brunswick, NJ: Rutgers University Press. Faung Jean Lee, J. (1991). Asian American Experiences in the United States. Jefferson, NC: McFarland & Company Gap Min, P., & Kim, R. (Eds.). (1998). Struggle for Ethnic Identity. Walnut Creek, CA: Altamira Press. Li, M., & Li, P. (Eds.). (1990). Understanding Asian Americans. New York: Neal Schuman Publishers. Christine Yeh, A. K. (n.d.). Retrieved Mar. 03, 2006, from Stereotypes of Asian American Students Web site: http://www.ericdigests.org/2002-4/asian.html.

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