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Video Analysis of Iron in the Soul: Portrait of the Caribbean

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Video Analysis of Iron in the Soul: Portrait of the Caribbean
The video Iron in the Soul: Portrait of the Caribbean examines the everlasting impression that slavery left behind in the Caribbean. More importantly the documentary explores how salves were treated by early plantation owners, and the repercussion of slavery to present day, which include but were not limited to religion, culture, and tradition.
Even centuries after slavery was abolished the history left behind by Britain after they abandoned the Caribbean is still evident today, generations later. With little of their original roots a lot of the slaves culture if not all of it has been absorbed and assimilated throughout time. British decided the only way to reshape the slaves culture was through a creolisation process of their true African essences. The impact of European culture plays an influential role on the Caribbean people. For example cricket, a game introduced from Britain who colonized Jamaica and Barbados (the national sport in Barbados) has become a game played by the Africans who were enslaved. Despite the British departure cricket is still embedded in their culture today, and ironic enough cricket has become one of the few escape routes from poverty. As with many other practices that were brought over it is now apart of their Caribbean culture, this is noticeable today from the way they dress, their language, culture and history. Plantocracy dominance has made it difficult for Caribbean people to preserve their identity, yet there are still signs of hope within the church. There are distinct differences in the way they practice religion in comparison to their European counterpart, although it was a side of cultural resistance that was not the only difference.
Britain’s made slavery into a prosperity business with their sole purpose of economical gain, their strong capitalist frame of mind decided to take it a step further when trying to acquire maximum profit. At any cost even if it meant diminishing the identity of an entire

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