Victorian England

Satisfactory Essays
The Victorian era, from the coronation of Queen Victoria in 1837 until her death in 1901, was an era of several unsettling social developments that forced writers more than ever before to take positions on the immediate issues animating the rest of society. Thus, although romantic forms of expression in poetry and prose continued to dominate English literature throughout much of the century, the attention of many writers was directed, sometimes passionately, to such issues as the growth of English democracy, the education of the masses, the progress of industrial enterprise and the consequent rise of a materialistic philosophy, and the plight of the newly industrialized worker. In addition, the unsettling of religious belief by new advances in science, particularly the theory of evolution and the historical study of the Bible, drew other writers away from the immemorial subjects of literature into considerations of problems of faith and truth.<br><br><b>Nonfiction </b><br>The historian Thomas Babington Macaulay, in his History of England (5 volumes, 1848-1861) and even more in his Critical and Historical Essays (1843), expressed the complacency of the English middle classes over their new prosperity and growing political power. The clarity and balance of Macaulay's style, which reflects his practical familiarity with parliamentary debate, stands in contrast to the sensitivity and beauty of the prose of John Henry Newman. Newman's main effort, unlike Macaulay's, was to draw people away from the materialism and skepticism of the age back to a purified Christian faith. His most famous work, Apologia pro vita sua (Apology for His Life, 1864), describes with psychological subtlety and charm the basis of his religious opinions and the reasons for his change from the Anglican to the Roman Catholic church.<br><br>Similarly alienated by the materialism and commercialism of the period, Thomas Carlyle, another of the great Victorians, advanced a heroic philosophy of work,

You May Also Find These Documents Helpful

  • Good Essays

    17th Century Virginia

    • 584 Words
    • 3 Pages

    Early 17th century Virginia faced many social and economic hardships. Many people came to Virginia in search of treasure and gold, but their miracle turned into somewhat of a disaster and they were in for a ride that they were not expecting. Due to starvation and diseases, the beginning of 17th century Virginia was a suffering colony. Famine seemed to take over colonial Virginia. Indentured servants and slaves are what helped save Virginia during these hardships.…

    • 584 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Powerful Essays

    Iraqi Culture

    • 2403 Words
    • 10 Pages

    This era became popular after the French Revolution when the people of Great Britain had revolted against the parliament. Once Queen Victoria was in power, she saw a reason to encourage society to improve, to enforce, to reform, to benefit, to prevent, to relieve, to educate, to reclaim, to encourage, to propagate, to maintain, to promote, to provide for, to support, to effect, to better, to instruct, to protect, to supersede, to employ, to civilize, to visit, to preserve, to convert, to mitigate, to abolish, to investigate, to publish, to aid, to extinguish. The Victorian Era was not seen as a dark period of credulity and superstition, but as an era of great deeds and deep emotions, far away from the prosaic and mechanical world of early industrial society. On the other hand, religion was not represented as a main focus because the central idea of this movement was human emotions. It caused Enlightenment rationalists lost power towards religion and came back to their cultural beliefs, however, religion was still part of their lives especially in their art. Also, there was a growing view in society that women should not be higher than a man and that she should out of respect let the man be in control, however, when Queen Victoria became in power she sparked a movement of equality for both genders and that same sense of…

    • 2403 Words
    • 10 Pages
    Powerful Essays
  • Good Essays

    The Victorian Era, the years of Queen Victoria’s reign: 1837-1901 were the years that many changes began to occur. With many changing attitudes towards religion, social values and ones-self came a transition that was for the best.…

    • 305 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Raevon Felton

    • 739 Words
    • 3 Pages

    The Victorian Era was a time during which Queen Victoria, born in 1819, reigned over the United Kingdom, ruling from 1837 until her death in 1901(“Victorian Era”). 1830 is considered the beginning of the Victorian Era to some literary historians, but the keystone that really made its mark on this era was the passage of the First Reform Bill in 1832 . This bill gave the middle-class Englishmen some form of hope toward finally being heard by their government (“Victorian Era”). “The death of the poet laureate William Wordsworth in 1850, rang the death knell for idyllic romanticism in the arts and the onset of Victorian high seriousness with the ascent of Alfred, Lord Tennyson (1809-1892) as the new poet laureate”(“Victorian Era”). This time period was more of a time of transition, and the end of the Victorian Era became evident in 1861, when prince Albert died of typhoid or cancer. The Victorian Era was considered the time period when literature began to develop from Romantic to the literature of the twentieth century (“Victorian Literature”). The widowed queen withdrew from the throne therefore robbing Great Britain of an intelligent and astute leader”(“Victorian Era”).…

    • 739 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Colonial America

    • 819 Words
    • 4 Pages

    The colonial period of America was a time of great change to the New World. People of the colonial period had very traditional thoughts and traditions. These different ideas influenced the unique society that America is today. The people of this time period had very different political, economic, and social values than we have today.…

    • 819 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    1800s America

    • 646 Words
    • 3 Pages

    During the 1800s, many major changes happened in America, whether it be changes in the cultural makeup of the people, American culture of the time, or freedoms and rights for women and African Americans. Many people immigrated to America during this time period, and cities grew very rapidly as a result of it, which caused some problems. Many reforms of art, literature, and society took place too. Finally, thoughts and ideas about abolishing slavery and granting women equal rights took place. As you can see, the 1800s was a period in America where change happened left and right that later on affected it both positively and negatively.…

    • 646 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    What did people in Victorian England do in their free time? “The evolving of man does not drive change -- it enables change.” (Unknown) Today, people surf the web, play video games, listen to their iPods, and watch TV (among other things). But back in the late 1700s/early 1800s, they did not have TVs, iPods, video games, or computers. With the resources available then, they would play sports, pick up a book to read, or have play time.…

    • 1271 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Satisfactory Essays

    Colonial Times

    • 815 Words
    • 4 Pages

    The colonists knew they needed the Native Americans for survival. The colonists were shocked by the beautiful pelts Native Americans made and…

    • 815 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Satisfactory Essays
  • Powerful Essays

    Colonial America

    • 2054 Words
    • 9 Pages

    Writing in 1782, J. Hector St. John de Crèvecoeur tried to define "the American, this new man." He was, Crèvecoeur argued, "neither a European nor a descendant of a European" but an "American, who, leaving behind all his ancient prejudices and manners, receives new ones from the new mode of life he has embraced, the new government he obeys, and the new rank he holds." Crèvecoeur presumed that America was a melting pot, that the environment created a homogeneous American culture, with similar values, beliefs, and social practices. Such cultural uniformity is inherently plausible. After all, most white colonial Americans worked the soil, enjoying the fruits of their labor, and practiced similar Protestant faiths. Moreover, they believed in private ownership of the means of production by individual cultivators. Generations of scholars, following the lead of Frederick Jackson Turner in the early twentieth century, argued that free and open land on the frontier created an American people whose identity was shaped by the independence land ownership provided and whose ideology was characterized by individualism, democracy, and equality of opportunity.…

    • 2054 Words
    • 9 Pages
    Powerful Essays
  • Satisfactory Essays

    Colonial Era

    • 318 Words
    • 2 Pages

    Was a well known preacher that took part in the Great Awakening (rise of Christianity)…

    • 318 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Satisfactory Essays
  • Good Essays

    19th Century America

    • 1050 Words
    • 5 Pages

    In the 19th century the American government went through a dramatic revolution in democracy that profoundly changed the way of life for many ordinary citizens. The average American now had a voice and could impact his community and the country. Though Americans were free to vote, only those with all of the correct qualifications were allowed to vote. The structure of democracy was democratic in principle, but not in application. Despite their claim of equality, the founding fathers left us with the gift of democracy belonging only to the "haves, and leaving out the "have nots." This new revolution began a movement for Americans to be equal regardless of their wealth.…

    • 1050 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Better Essays

    Lets face it, at some point or another in our lives we hear a baby crying and think to ourselves, Why are babies so smelly, noisy and expensive. 140 years ago some parents thought the same thing, and they decided to deal with it by sending their kids to a ‘Baby Farm’. A baby-farmer is a woman who would offer to look after your children for you. For only five to ten pounds and you would never see your children again. Of course now person would raise a child for five pounds, instead the babies were neglected. In fact the more babies that died the more money they would make and save. In fact a written description of one of these babies was that it was…

    • 1610 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Good Essays

    Regency England

    • 403 Words
    • 2 Pages

    Regency England was highly structured and intensely class-conscious. During the period, the social ladder was an extremely fixed and rigid hierarchy within the nobility and the rest of the population. Those of the higher class, often referred to as the ton, lived extremely privileged and indulgent lifestyles, while the middle class where more interested in morality than manners.…

    • 403 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    The Victorian era of British history was the period of Queen Victoria's reign from 20 June…

    • 1076 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Satisfactory Essays

    victorian erea

    • 338 Words
    • 2 Pages

    On Wednesday, December 4th I saw an original play called “A Christmas Carol” by: Charles Dickens. The play was presented by the Reagan theater program at the Reagan auditorium. This joyful and upbeat play was about a ungrateful man the resented giving. When visited by his old co-worker ‘Jacob Marley’ telling his that he will be visited by three ghost. The Christmas past, present, and lastly the ghost of Christmas future. After undergoing the ghosts work Ebenezer Scrooge became a changed man that love the time of Christmas year.…

    • 338 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Satisfactory Essays