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Value Of Education In The United States

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Value Of Education In The United States
The value of education within the United States has been highly emphasized as an open opportunity towards chasing the “American Dream”. During the colonial era, New England colonists such as the Puritans from the Massachusetts Bay Colony, provided a system for public education to create a common ground for those that immigrated from the Northern and Western regions of Europe. While public education at the time was established to create an equal plane field within a new society, the development of municipalities and spread of suburban areas over time has caused a difference in school funding as it has become a state and local responsibility to ensure communities public education. In today’s society, the disparities between schools has widened …show more content…
In addressing the disparities between poorer and richer schools and the flaws that lie within the education funding system, the Associated Press’s proposal for equal funding in public school education pushes too far in proposing equal funding for public schools, as this would affect state and local taxation for those living in the area without taking consideration of income level within the school’s …show more content…
The formula we see today seems simple enough: the higher the property taxes and the greater the value of a home, the more taxes are filed and thus the more money the school acquires. The property tax, which was introduced in founding America, was agreed upon representatives of a large region and ensured equality in resources for education. However, urban-to-suburban migration and the establishment of edge cities separated people based on income-level, and even reinstalled the issue of race with the “white flight” in the mid-20th century. Thus, demographic changes moved public schooling farther away from federal funding, and as a result a greater dependency on the state and local city. The initial motives of equality in regional funding over time has led to “inadequate funding” and unequal distribution because of migration and the property tax, according to attorney Joseph P. Moodhe, who is mentioned in an article regarding public school funding on The Atlantic. However, inequality does continue to exist today, because schools are given money based on the amount that is available in a district. Even the money that schools such as Stevenson get from their local property taxes may not exactly be what is needed to ensure a student a good path towards a

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