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Utilitarianism

By jrivera2014 Mar 20, 2014 738 Words
Lesson 2.1 – Issues at the Beginning of Life
In vitro fertilization has become very popular for those who are not able to conceive naturally. There are many factors to consider when deciding to have any reproductive procedure done. The parents-to-be need to be well educated with the procedure that will going to be performed. Research is very important. Having a clear understanding on what will be happening before, during, and after having this procedure. Becoming pregnant is similar to winning the lottery. There’s a slim chance of winning it. If they lose, couples end up looking into other alternatives such as in vitro, a fertilization procedure that can become a long journey for both prospective parents. One of the factors that need to be discussed is the well being and the interest of the new addition. New parents think that having a baby can resolve any marital problems but sometimes this backfires. The added stress of the process can affect a marriage. Many factors like money, failed attempts, social pressure, etc. can negatively impact the expecting family. The prospective parents need to understand that this will be a long and tedious process. It is very different than the process to conceive naturally. Doctors should clearly explain the procedure, the pros and cons, and respect any decision made. Another factor is the potential health of the child. In this case their parents seem to be very healthy and active individuals. But can a 57 years old woman, manage to endure a pregnancy as well as become a mother at this age? Why take the risk? These questions need to be discussed and thoroughly researched before taking the first step. Statistics from the CDC mentioned at the WebMed stated that “a woman who is under age 35 and undergoes IVF has a 39.6% chance of having a baby, while a woman over age 40 has an 11.5% chance”. It is clear that children conceived by the in vitro fertilization are expected to be born preterm, with a low birth weight. They are also known to be twins or multiple babies and suffer from birth defects. But it is good to know that these numbers have been decreased as the techniques advance and the doctors become more experienced. What happens with the extra embryos? I don’t think that Jean and Jerry will be able to have any more children. Jean had twins at the age of 58. Embryos are frozen to be used later if the first trail didn’t work. But what will happen with those that won’t be needed? Sometimes, parents do not state what it is that they want to do with the extra embryos. “In a recent survey of 58 couples, researchers from the University of California in San Francisco found that 72 percent were undecided about the fate of their stored embryos.” “20 percent of couples who wanted no more children said they planned or expected to keep their embryos frozen indefinitely.” I will use “autonomy” as my major principle of ethics in this scenario. Jean and Jerry have the right to make their own decision in the in vitro fertilization process. They seemed competent when they made the decision to have the process done. They were not forced and they were not trying to please no, just themselves. I am sure that they have sought other options as well. It is important to ask, ask, ask…. “Is it possible?” “How do I do this?”, “Is it ethical” “is it safe?”, “What is the social impact?” But these decisions have to be left to the parents, “who provide the reproductive apparatus to create a baby”. It is important to understand that children should not be viewed as personal property or to satisfy adult wishes or needs. “When making individual reproductive decisions or public policy, the good of the potential child, along with the general cultural conditions that support childrearing and family life should be the primary consideration”. “Collaborative reproduction risks the good of the child, the good of the families, and the need of the culture to uphold moral responsibility”. It is important to be aware of the pros and cons of the procedure, and understand that this can’t be reversed. “Means are ends in the making” ~Ghandi WORKS CITED

Banerjee, Amit Kumar. "ISPUB.com." Internet Scientific Publications. N.p., n.d. Web. 10 Jan. 2014.

(n.d.). Retrieved from http://www.webmd.com/infertility-and-reproduction/guide/in-vitro-fertilization?page=2

http://www.parenting.com/article/the-fate-of-frozen-embryos

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