The Use of Adlerian and Rational Emotive Behavior Therapy on an Adolescent With Post traumatic Stress Disorder.

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The University of DenverAlfred Adler created a psychological theory that focused on feelings of inferiority. Adler saw feelings of inferiority as normal, and recognized that such feelings had the potential to be used as a motivation to strive for mastery. Aaron T.Beck created Rational emotive behavior therapy (REBT). REBT suggests that our emotions branch from our beliefs, evaluations, interpretations, and reactions to life situations. Through REBT, a client can become aware of the irrational beliefs and replace them with rational cognitions.

Alfred Adler believed that social relations motivate all clients. Adlerian therapy consists of four phases, all of which utilize Adler's overall theme of client encouragement. The first phase goal is to create a strong therapeutic alliance between the client and therapist, which Adler considered necessary in order for a client to progress in treatment. This initial stage is where the client and therapist agree upon a therapeutic goal. Adlerian therapists believe that a strong therapeutic relationship beginning in this phase is necessary for therapeutic efficacy in the other 3 phases of therapy (Watts, 2000). The second phase is the subjective and objective interview. The purpose of this phase is to help the client tell his or her story. (In addition to the combination of Alderian and REBT therapy, I will also be explaining the subjective and objective interview as a diagnostic tool.) The third phase involves increasing the client's self-understanding and insight, the purpose of which is to increase the client's awareness of the motivation of his or her maladaptive behaviors. The fourth phase is re-education and re-orientation, also referred to as the action stage. In this stage, the client translates insight into action. The client should start practicing is discussed in therapy.

On the other hand, Rational Emotive Behavior Therapy uses the A-B-C framework, cognitive, emotive, and behavioral techniques to help clients. In

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