United States Healthcare: an Annotated Bibliography

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United States Healthcare: An Annotated Bibliography
Over the past hundred years, there have been several changes to the healthcare profession. A change from just being happy to care for one’s patients day or night to “you have to have money and insurance for me to treat you.” Gone are the days that one could walk into a hospital and not have to worry about how he or she was going to pay the bill, gone are the days that having insurance was one’s own choice, and gone are the days that choosing one’s personal doctor was by whom a person liked and not by who accepted one’s insurance.
Berkman, Lisa F. "The Health Divide." Contexts 2004: 38-44. Print.
In this article the author is talking about the effects of the healthcare divide by social standards. The author states that the average life span of Americans has been way below the normal of the rest of the world. This article points out that men who live in Harlem are less likely to make it to age 65 than men who live in Bangladesh.(38) It could be because Americans are less likely to take initiative in receiving treatment, or it could possibly be because Americans have more money, more fast food venues, and fewer concerns for taking care of their own health. Chronic diseases are the most likely cause for early demise in men and women in the U.S. According to the CDC (Centers for Disease Control), children younger than 12 years old have the highest rate of death from chronic disease.(39) The chronic disease could be anything from heart malformation to premature birth. Either way, those chronic diseases could have been treated simply in a hospital setting.
Champlin, Dell P., and Janet T. Knoedler. "Universal Health Care and the Economics of Responsibility." Journal of Economic Issues 42.4 (2008): 913-38. Print. In Congress, healthcare is being discussed as something that will be made mandatory. It is believed that as a “human right” people should all have access to healthcare and insurance. That insurance system is



Bibliography: Champlin, Dell P., and Janet T. Knoedler. "Universal Health Care and the Economics of Responsibility." Journal of Economic Issues 42.4 (2008): 913-38. Print. Garrett, Bowen, Matthew Buettgens, Lan Doan, Irene Headen, and John Holahan Holahan, John, and Bowen Garrett. "The Cost of Uncompensated Care with and without Health Reform." Timely Analysis of Immediate Health Policy Issues (2010): 1-5. Print. Menzel, Paul, and Donald W "News Release: Secretary Sebelius Highlights Two New Reports on Health Care Quality, Says Improving Quality Is Key Component of Health Reform." US Health and Human Services Press Office. 6 Mar. 2009. Web. Quadagno, Jill. "Why the United States Has No National Health Insurance: Stakeholder Mobilization against the Welfare State, 1945-1996." Journal of Health and Social Behavior 45 (2004): 25-44. Print. Rogoff, Kenneth Starfield, Barbara, Leiyu Shi, and James Macinko. "Contribution of Primary Care to Health Systems and Health." The Milbank Quarterly 83.3 (2005): 457-502. Print. "The Future of U.S

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