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Unite Prison Experiment: Questions And Answers

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Unite Prison Experiment: Questions And Answers
Stanford Prison Experiment
1) What police procedures are used during arrests, and how do these procedures lead people to feel confused, fearful, and dehumanized?
a. Policemen went around the neighborhood to arrest college students from their houses for robbery, burglary, and violation of penal codes. After they were searched, spread against the police car and handcuffed, they brought them to the police station. The guards had worn sunglasses so the suspects wouldn’t be able to look at their eyes, feeling fear. The suspects were confused because they were left blindfolded in the cell to wonder what they’ve done wrong. What left them dehumanized is that they were searched from head to toe and had no way to fight against him, the policeman
…show more content…
How sure are you?
a. If I were a guard, I’d want to be a “good guy”. I’d do little favors for them and they wouldn’t shout at me, I’d be the favorable guard and not feel as threatened as the others. I hope that the prisoners wouldn’t treat me as badly as the stricter guards that have “fun” with the prisoners as if they were toys.
3) What prevented "good guards" from objecting or countermanding the orders from tough or bad guards?
a. The guards had different shifts. So the night shift was too lenient and let the prisoners rebel and do whatever they want but when the morning shift arrived, they were mad at how the prisoners disobeyed them. They blamed the night shift but they don’t work together so they have no communication therefore, the good guards can’t be good guards when the bad guards are messing up the prisoners when it’s their shift.
4) If you were a prisoner, would you have been able to endure the experience? What would you have done differently than those subjects did? If you were imprisoned in a "real" prison for five years or more, could you take
…show more content…
I feel like the prisoners would feel betrayed by their fellow researchers. I would hold a grudge against the guards because they didn’t have to go through that trouble. I don’t believe that the guards felt bad about the prisoners because they’re free now, but the prisoners were starving and treated poorly. I think that the prisoners and the guards both felt relieved that the prison was reconverted to the basement lab because the prisoners have spent horrible days in there; starving, restless, and bathing in their filth. The guards probably were relieved because they didn’t have to stand around and watch over the

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