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Underground Railroad Essay Outline

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Underground Railroad Essay Outline
Underground Railroad Underground Railroad was used for slaves who evidently, grew tired of the way the southern whites treated them. Though, the name says that it 's an "Underground Railroad" it was given that name because of the way escaped slaves had to be carried out secretly. It did not contain a railroad nor was it underground. Never would slaves (those who knew about the Underground Railroad) escape during the day time; it was secrecy that led them into succession. The darkness helped a lot for a disguise; slaves who carried babies had to be under a hallucinogenic drug called, opium. The leader of this slavery escape route was a strong African ex-slave named, Harriet Tubman, since she was the leader of the whole thing a $40,000 reward …show more content…
During the 1850, Congress did not tolerate this. They thought that this was getting way too far because of the fact that millions of slaves have escaped. Because of Harriet’s refusal to obeying the laws, Congress thought that this was totally unconstitutional (Kennedy 395). In September 1850 the Fugitive Slave Act was passed. This meant that ex-slaves or free slaves would have to return to the south to do hard labor. Slave catchers traveled through the North with guns and horses looking for a runaway slave that made it twice harder for them to escape. Non-slaves were also accused of being slaves. When caught by slave catchers, the slaves were often punished harshly and/or beaten to death. As the slaves still fight for their freedom, in 1870, an abolitionist’s movement formed. Radical Abolitionist fervor of the Second Great- Awakening, that leads people to emancipate on religious grounds. Their ideas increased throughout the Northern churches. This movement created emancipation for slaves and hoping the end of segregations. But as they move westward and expanded, this lead to the Civil …show more content…
Elizabeth Cohen, and Thomas A. Bailey. The American Pageant: A History of the Republic. 13th ed. Boston: Hought Miffin company, 2001.
McGill, Sara-Ann “Underground Railroad.” Web.evscohost.com. EBSCOhost, ,2009. Web. 29 Nov. 2012.
“Underground Railroad.” Encyclopedia Britanica online school edition. Encyclopedia Britanica, inc. Nov. 29 2012. (School.eb.com/eb/article-9074229)
"Underground Railroad." History.com. A&E Television Networks, n.d. Web. 11 Jan. 2013.
Primary Source
Webber, Charles T. “The underground railroad/Chas. T. Webber.” Photograph. c. 1893. From Library of Congress, Prints and Photographs Division. http://www.loc.gov/pictures/item/98510370/
“George Peck’s grand revival of Stetson’s Uncle Tom’s cabin booked by Klaw & Erlanger.” Lithograph. N.Y. A.S. Seer’s Union Square Print., [1886]. From Library of Congress, Prints and Photographs Division.

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